Friday March 22, 2019
Home Lead Story Fujifilm&#821...

Fujifilm’s Retro-Style Camera in India For Rs 49,999

"FUJIFILM X-A5" is the smallest and lightest mirrorless digital camera within the "X Series" zoom lens kit, the company claimed

0
//
Fujifilm India Launches New Analog Instant Camera
New Fujifilm medium format mirrorless camera in India. (IANS)

Imaging technology company Fujifilm on Tuesday launched its retro-style mirrorless digital camera “X-A5” in India for Rs 49,999.

The camera comes with a 180-degree tilting rear liquid crystal display (LCD) screen, built-in Bluetooth, 24.2MP Advanced Photo System type-C (APS-C) sensor, phase detection auto-focus (PDAF), extended battery life and a faster image processing engine.

“‘FUJIFILM X-A5’ is an affordable solution to provide a refined photography experience among amateurs, particularly designed for Instagrammers and for those who consider photography as a lifestyle,” Haruto Iwata, Managing Director, Fujifilm India, said in a statement.

Also Read: Google to Train 8,000 Indian Journalists on Fact-checking

Other features of the camera include a newly-developed compact wide-angle zoom lens and new user interface, film stimulation modes and a broader range of video functions with 4K capabilities.

“FUJIFILM X-A5” is the smallest and lightest mirrorless digital camera within the “X Series” zoom lens kit, the company claimed.

The camera is available in brown, pink and black colours on Amazon India. (IANS)

Next Story

Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

0
water
Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

water
Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

water
Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)