Monday March 30, 2020

Consuming Full-Fat Dairy Products Does Not Lead to Obesity: Study

Full-fat dairy products not linked to weight gain, high BP in kids

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Dairy products
There is no evidence that consuming full-fat dairy products increases children's risk of obesity or heart disease. Pixabay

There is no evidence that consuming full-fat dairy products increases children’s risk of obesity or heart disease, says a new study that raises questions about the current dietary advice for children.

“Dietary guidelines in Australia and other countries recommend children primarily consume reduced-fat dairy  to maintain a healthy weight and good cardiovascular health,” said the study’s lead author Therese O’Sullivan, Associate Professor at Edith Cowan University in Joondalup, Australia.

“We found studies were consistent in reporting that whole-fat dairy products were not associated with increased levels of weight gain or obesity,” she said.

Published in the journal Advances in Nutrition, the research reviewed 29 studies from around the world that examined consumption of full-fat dairy products in children.

The researchers found there was no clear link between the consumption of whole-fat dairy items and weight gain, high cholesterol or high blood pressure in children.

“Reduced-fat dairy is generally recommended for both adults and children over the age of two years due to its lower energy and saturated fat content,” O’Sullivan said.

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The research suggests that whole-fat dairy products may play an important role in a balanced diet for growing children. Pixabay

“However, studies suggest children who consumed low-fat over full-fat dairy products were actually replacing those calories from fat with other foods.

“This suggests that low-fat dairy is not as filling as whole-fat dairy, which may lead kids to consume more of other foods. Health effects may depend on what these replacement foods are,” she added.

The research suggests that whole-fat dairy products may play an important role in a balanced diet for growing children.

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“Dairy is a good dietary source of nutrients for healthy development, including protein, calcium, potassium, phosphorus and several vitamins,” she said.

“Even though the fats found in whole-fat dairy are mostly saturated fats, they don’t appear to be associated with the same detrimental health effects observed with foods like fatty meats,” she added. (IANS)

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Talkative Children Perform Better at School: Study

Chatty kids do get good marks at school

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Children
Researchers have found that young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced. Pixabay

Dear parents, if you want to boost your childs academic performance, let them chat more. Researchers have found that young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced.

The study, by researchers at the University of York in the UK, looked at why children from wealthier and well-educated family backgrounds tend to do better at school.

The researchers found that children from families of higher socioeconomic status had better language abilities at nursery school age and that these verbal skills boosted their later academic performance throughout the school.

“Our findings show that a child’s learning at home, when they are under five, is really important to their chances of later academic success,” said study lead author Sophie von Stumm, Professor at the University of York.

Children
Children from high socioeconomic backgrounds were at an advantage when it came to their non-verbal skills – such as solving puzzles, drawing shapes and copying actions – before they started school, the researchers said. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the journal Child Development, the researchers looked at data from nearly 700 British children.

The children’s pre-school ability was tested at four-years-old and their educational outcomes were tracked throughout school up until the age of 16.

According to the researchers, differences in language skills between children explained around 50 per cent of the effect of family background on children’s achievement in the first year of school.

This achievement gap widened over the course of their education, the study suggests.

“Kids from more advantaged backgrounds are more familiar before starting school with the language patterns and linguistic codes that are used in formal educational settings and are expected by teachers,” Stumm said.

“Not all kids get the same start in life, but this study highlights the importance of helping parents of all backgrounds to engage with their children in activities which enhance verbal skills – such as reading bedtime stories and engaging the child in conversations,” Stumm added.

According to the researchers, activities designed to improve verbal skills boost cognitive, social and emotional development, in addition to benefitting parent-child bonding.

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The researchers also looked at non-verbal ability at nursery school age and found that it had a smaller, but never-the-less significant role in explaining the link between background inequalities and academic success.

Kids from high socioeconomic backgrounds were at an advantage when it came to their non-verbal skills – such as solving puzzles, drawing shapes and copying actions – before they started school, the researchers said. (IANS)