Monday April 6, 2020
Home World Full Moons li...

Full Moons likely to cause Bigger Earthquakes, says Researchers at University of Tokyo

While the theory is not new, the study is the first to find a statistical link between the moon and earthquakes

0
//
Seagulls fly as the full moon rises behind the ancient marble Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, southeast of Athens, on the eve of the summer solstice. VOA

September 14, 2016: Researchers at the University of Tokyo say large quakes are more likely during high tides, which happen twice a day. During high tides, the oceans are pulled by the moon’s gravity, but during a full and new moon, twice a month, the tides are particularly high, especially when the moon, the sun, and Earth line up.

Full moons may cause bigger earthquakes, according to a new study. This, researchers say, can further stress geological faults, triggering earthquakes.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

“The probability of a tiny rock failure expanding to a gigantic rupture increases with increasing tidal stress levels,” the researchers wrote in an article that appeared in the British journal Nature Geoscience.

While the theory is not new, the study is the first to find a statistical link between the moon and earthquakes.

For example, the researchers found that the 2004 Sumatra quake as well as a major 2011 quake in Japan both happened during high tides. The researchers say nine of the 12 biggest quakes ever recorded were timed with full or new moons.

The findings could help with earthquake forecasting, especially in places like Japan where earthquakes are common.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

“Scientists will find this result if confirmed, quite interesting,” said University of Washington seismologist John Vidale, who was not involved in the study.

But he added that “even if there is a strong correlation of big earthquakes with full or new moons, the chance any given week of a deadly earthquake remains minuscule.”(VOA)

Next Story

The Positive Effect of COVID-19 Lockdown on Earth

Earth's crust is shaking less as people stay home

0
Earth
The COVID-19 lockdowns globally have not only made air breathable or rivers clean but have also resulted in the way our Earth moves. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The COVID-19 lockdowns globally have not only made air breathable or rivers clean but have also resulted in the way our Earth moves, as researchers now report a drop in seismic noise (the hum of vibrations in the planets crust) because transport networks, real estate and other human activities have been shut down.

According an article in the journal Nature, efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus mean that the planet itself is moving a little less, which could “allow detectors to spot smaller earthquakes and boost efforts to monitor volcanic activity and other seismic events”.

Vibrations caused by moving vehicles and industrial machinery produce background noise, which reduces seismologists’ ability to detect other signals occurring at the same frequency.

Please follow NewsGram on Facebook to get updates on the latest news

“A noise reduction of this magnitude is usually only experienced briefly around Christmas,” said Thomas Lecocq, a seismologist with the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Brussels which has observed the drop in seismic noise.

Data from a seismometer at the observatory show that measures to curb the spread of COVID-19 in Brussels caused human-induced seismic noise to fall by about one-third. In Belgium, scientists report at least a 30 per cent reduction in that amount of ambient human noise since lockdown began there.

Earth
It has been found that the crust of the Earth is shaking less. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The current drop has boosted the sensitivity of the observatory’s equipment, improving its ability to detect waves in the same high frequency range as the noise, said the Nature article. However, not all seismic monitoring stations will see an effect as pronounced as the one observed in Brussels.

According to Emily Wolin, a geologist at the US Geological Survey in Albuquerque, New Mexico, many stations are purposefully located in remote areas to avoid human noise. “These should see a smaller decrease, or no change at all, in the level of high-frequency noise they record,” she was quoted as saying.

Please follow NewsGram on Twitter to get updates on the latest news

The fall in noise could also benefit seismologists who use naturally occurring background vibrations, such as those from crashing ocean waves, to probe Earth’s crust. A fall in human-induced noise could boost the sensitivity of detectors to natural waves at similar frequencies “There’s a big chance indeed it could lead to better measurements,” said Lecocq.

Also Read- Know About the Health Benefits of Being a Vegan

The reduction in seismic activity, like reduction in air pollution, also show that people are adhering to social distancing guidelines.

“From the seismological point of view, we can motivate people to say, ‘OK look, people. You feel like you’re alone at home, but we can tell you that everyone is home. Everyone is doing the same. Everyone is respecting the rules,'” Lecocq told CNN. (IANS)