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Full Moons likely to cause Bigger Earthquakes, says Researchers at University of Tokyo

While the theory is not new, the study is the first to find a statistical link between the moon and earthquakes

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Seagulls fly as the full moon rises behind the ancient marble Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, southeast of Athens, on the eve of the summer solstice. VOA

September 14, 2016: Researchers at the University of Tokyo say large quakes are more likely during high tides, which happen twice a day. During high tides, the oceans are pulled by the moon’s gravity, but during a full and new moon, twice a month, the tides are particularly high, especially when the moon, the sun, and Earth line up.

Full moons may cause bigger earthquakes, according to a new study. This, researchers say, can further stress geological faults, triggering earthquakes.

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“The probability of a tiny rock failure expanding to a gigantic rupture increases with increasing tidal stress levels,” the researchers wrote in an article that appeared in the British journal Nature Geoscience.

While the theory is not new, the study is the first to find a statistical link between the moon and earthquakes.

For example, the researchers found that the 2004 Sumatra quake as well as a major 2011 quake in Japan both happened during high tides. The researchers say nine of the 12 biggest quakes ever recorded were timed with full or new moons.

The findings could help with earthquake forecasting, especially in places like Japan where earthquakes are common.

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“Scientists will find this result if confirmed, quite interesting,” said University of Washington seismologist John Vidale, who was not involved in the study.

But he added that “even if there is a strong correlation of big earthquakes with full or new moons, the chance any given week of a deadly earthquake remains minuscule.”(VOA)

Next Story

Chile Survives Through Major Quake With Little Damage

Chile is located along the so-called Ring of Fire, which makes it one of the most seismic countries in the world.

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Boats lifted by an earthquake-triggered tsunami sit on a dock, in Coquimbo, Chile, Sept. 18, 2015. A magnitude 6.7 quake struck the city Jan. 19, 2018, but no tsunami was generated. VOA

A 6.7-magnitude earthquake has shaken cities on Chile’s northern coast. No damages have been reported so far, but Chile’s National Emergency Office ordered a preventative evacuation of a stretch of coast near the city of Coquimbo.

Chilean authorities said the quake didn’t have the characteristics that would generate a tsunami. The U.S. Tsunami Warning System also ruled out a tsunami.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the epicenter of the magnitude-6.7 quake was 15.6 kilometers (9.7 miles) south-southwest of Coquimbo, and had a depth of 53 kilometers. It struck at 7:32 p.m. local time.

Chile
Earthquake epicenter

A witness told Reuters there was minor damage to older buildings and power outages in the nearby coastal city of La Serena, a popular beach town about 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of Santiago.

“It felt very strong … the tourists were very nervous, but nothing serious happened,” Camila Castillo, a receptionist at a hotel in La Serena, told Reuters.

Chilean miner Antofagasta Plc said operations were normal at its Los Pelambres copper mine following the nearby earthquake.

Also Read: Amazon.com In Talks With Chile To Create A Ground For Developing Artificial Intelligence

Chile is located along the so-called Ring of Fire, which makes it one of the most seismic countries in the world.Chile is located along the so-called Ring of Fire, which makes it one of the most seismic countries in the world. An 8.8-magnitude earthquake and ensuing tsunami in 2010 killed 525 people. (VOA)