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According to research, virtual learning has been proven to enhance retention of information and take up less time

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world."
-N
elson Mandela


Schools all across the world have been closed as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. Over 1.2 billion children are out of school across the globe. (Reported by UNICEF). Because of this, education has changed immensely, with the introduction of e-learning, in which tutoring is provided remotely and using various digital platforms. According to research, virtual learning has been proven to enhance retention of information and take up less time, indicating that the changes produced by the coronavirus may be here to stay in the future.


However, many emphases have focused on "recovering" the current system, but there is a chance to "build back better".So, let's see the future of education after Covid19.


Challenges of covid for education

  • Learning Loss
  • Mental Health, Trauma, and Safety
  • The strain on Learning: Professors, Teachers and Early Childhood Educators


Is physical learning a more effective form of learning than e-learning?

One important lesson to be learned from the COVID-19 situation is that the traditional physical teaching method with eye-to-eye contact is still the most effective form of learning. On the other hand, technology is a powerful facilitator, and as such, it has a significant role to play in the educational system.

The majority of educational institutions are trying with digital learning and trainers learning to adapt to new technologies. Training of teaching will need to be revised to include practical elements of technology in education and theoretical aspects of technology. In conjunction with improved methodology, the effective use of technology will be an essential component of teaching training programmes in the near future.

teacher teaching Traditional physical teaching method with eye-to-eye contact is still the most effective form of learning. | Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash



Why should we adopt eLearning forever?

Online education allows teachers and students to determine their learning speed and set a timetable that works for everyone. Using an online educational platform provides a better balance of professional and academics, so no sacrifices are required. Online education includes time management skills, making work-study balance more straightforward. A shared plan can encourage both students and teachers to take on new tasks and gain more autonomy.

Online education is usually cheaper than in-person schooling. Payment choices frequently include instalments or per class. This improves budget management. Many of you may be eligible for discounts or scholarships, so the cost is low. You may also save money on travel and class supplies by using free resources. In other words, the financial investment is lower, but the returns may be superior.

There are limitless skills, techniques and subjects to teach and learn on the internet. More institutions and colleges are offering online programmes for all levels and subjects. Every student can choose from learning dancing to higher mathematics. Online programmes allow you to get an official certificate, diploma, or degree without ever having to step foot on a university campus.

Tutors and students can use internet resources like YouTube videos, pictures, and eBooks to enhance their teaching and learning. This supplementary content is available at any time, anywhere, making your education more dynamic and personalised.

homeschooling during the pandemic There are limitless skills, techniques and subjects to teach and learn on the internet. | Photo by Ralston Smith on Unsplash



Why should we not adopt eLearning forever?

The present E-Learning tends to isolate and contemplate students. As a result of the absence of social interaction, many students and teachers who spend a lot of time online might develop social isolation. Lack of communication and social isolation typically leads to mental health concerns, including stress, anxiety, and negative thinking.

However, in an eLearning environment, there are fewer external factors that motivate students. In many situations, students are left to their own devices during learning activities with no encouragement. Students pursuing E-Learning courses will frequently be expected to master a tricky subject in the comfort of their own homes, without the extra pressure of traditional universities. As a result, students who lack motivation and time management skills may struggle to meet regular deadlines when studying online.

Unfortunately, one of the significant drawbacks of E-Learning is cheating. In Online mode, students can easily cheat in examinations since they are in their own surroundings, with no supervisor and disciple around. This takes the essence of a test and assessment away from the life of a student. Without a video stream, pupils cannot be directly watched during exams. Also, without appropriate identity verification, students taking online tests may allow a third person to take the test in their place, resulting in a false test result.

boy leaning on white chair Because of the absence of social interaction, many students and teachers who spend a lot of time online might develop social isolation. | Photo by Chinh Le Duc on Unsplash



Keywords: COVID, education, aftermath, e-learning, aftermath, classes, social, students


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