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Future wars might be cyber wars, says Parrikar

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New Delhi: Stressing on the need for enhanced cyber security, Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said on Monday that the Indian Army must be vigilant against information manipulations by militant outfits like ISIS.

Apprehending that cyberspace will be the next war zone, Parrikar underscored the need for acquiring enhanced competencies to thwart attacks from terrorist outfits.

Parrikar mentioned that ISIS was using the social media platforms extensively to spread their ideology, and said, a counter-strategy must be formulated to curb the virulent attack.

“The world that we as a nation will be interacting with is increasingly fraught with turbulence and will call for dominant military might. We need to develop technology and system appropriate to evolving military doctrine,” Parrikar said addressing the DEFCOM seminar here organised by the Corps of Signal of the Indian Army and the CII.

He, however, stated that conventional defence forces could never be substituted and the process of honing them will continue to combat growing threats.

Speaking about the need for proper use of the developing internet technology, Parrikar said, “One can take the example of terrorist organisations like Daish or ISIS. They use the Internet to ensure a lot of recruitment or support, and they are one of the best users of Internet technology for promoting their cause.”

Warning of a possible information blackout triggered by ultra-bodies, Parrikar said, developing internet technology has become of utmost important in the backdrop of rapid global development in the cyberspace.

Handling of information via internet could be both sensitive and tricky, as there was always the threat of data overload, said Parrikar, adding, finding vital information might become like searching a needle in a stack of hay.

Digitalisation of the forces would equip them to foil cyber-attacks by the adversaries, Parrikar added.

The defence minister expressed firm belief that India will become a dominant force in the cyber world in recent times.

(With inputs from agencies)

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More Than 76% Indian Companies Hit by Cyber Attacks in Year 2018

More than 18 per cent threats discovered in India are on mobile devices, which is almost double than the global average

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cyberattack
Image source: wordpress.com

Over 76 per cent organisations in India were hit by cyber attacks in 2018 as IT security continued to be a major issue across the globe, global cyber security major Sophos said on Wednesday.

According to Sophos’ “7 Uncomfortable Truths of Endpoint Security” survey, IT managers are more likely to catch cyber criminals on their organisation’s servers and networks than anywhere else.

IT managers discovered 39 per cent of their most significant cyber attacks on their organisation’s servers and 34.5 per cent on its networks.

The survey was conducted on 3,000 IT decision-makers from mid-sized businesses in 12 countries including the US, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, the UK, France, Germany, Australia, Japan, India and South Africa.

Cyberattacks
An employee works near screens in the virus lab at the headquarters of Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Labs in Moscow, July 29, 2013. VOA

More than 18 per cent threats discovered in India are on mobile devices, which is almost double than the global average.

Also, 92 per cent Indian IT managers wished they had a stronger team in place to properly detect, investigate and respond to security incidents.

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“Server security stakes are at an all-time high with servers being used to store financial, employee, proprietary and other sensitive data. Today, IT managers need to focus on protecting business-critical servers to stop cyber criminals from getting on to the network,” Sunil Sharma, Managing Director, Sales at Sophos India and SAARC, said in a statement.

“They can’t ignore endpoints because most cyber attacks start there, yet a higher than expected amount of IT managers still can’t identify how threats are getting into the system and when.” (IANS)