Wednesday November 13, 2019

Future of The World Lies in Hands of Children, Says Actress Priyanka Chopra

"They are the future and we need to help.”

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Priyanka Chopra Jonas
Actress Priyanka Chopra Jonas.

Actress Priyanka Chopra Jonas, a global Unicef Goodwill Ambassador for Child Rights, marked World Refugee Day on Thursday with a special message.

The 36-year-old star pledged her support to children who have been forced to flee their homes. She even shared a video of herself from her meetings with children at refugee camps.

“The truth is quite simple… the future of this world lies in the hands of the children of today. But the harsh reality is that there is an entire generation of innocent children growing up right now without any prospects for thier future… these children are affected by displacement due to serious conflict and emergencies in thier various regions,” Priyanka wrote alongside the video on Instagram.

Actress Priyanka Chopra.

The actress, who has travelled to refugee camps in Jordan, Bangladesh and more recently in Ethiopia, added: “When families are forced to leave their homes due to violence, persecution, natural disasters, they are torn apart and it’s the children that end up suffering the most. The numbers are staggering, yes… but we have to continue to stand for them, in whatever capacity we can as individuals.”

Also Read- What’s Common in Several Bollywood Divas? Find it out Here

“They are the future and we need to help.” (IANS)

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Impaired Liver Function During Pregnancy Leads To Obese Kids

Impaired liver function during pregnancy increases the risks of obesity in kids

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Pregnancy
Impaired liver function during pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity in children. PIxabay

Impaired liver function during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase the risk of obesity in children, according to a new study.

In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired, particularly when they were fed a Western-style, high-fat diet.

“These findings further suggest that health during pregnancy can have long-term effects on children. In this case they suggest that gut microbiome alterations, may increase the risk of obesity in children, when fed a western style, high-fat diet, ” said study researcher Caroline Ovadia from King’s College London.

The most common liver disease in pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis (ICP), reduces the release of digestive fluid bile from the liver causing bile acids to build up in the blood, impairing liver function. This causes severe itching in the mother and increases risks of stillbirth and preterm birth for the baby.

pregnancy
In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired. Pixabay

Previous studies suggest that children of women with ICP are more likely to develop childhood obesity.

For the findings, the research team investigated how gut microbiota are affected in the offspring of a mouse model of ICP.

The results reported that the offspring had a different gut microbiome composition and liver function, particularly when fed a high-fat diet, which could contribute to impaired metabolism and increase risk of obesity.

The results suggest that mice born to mothers with ICP, or other liver diseases, may benefit from maintaining a healthy diet and should avoid fatty foods.

These findings also suggest that targeting microbiome composition with treatment strategies in pregnant women, such as using pre-biotics or pro-biotics, could help prevent the risk of child obesity.

Also Read- Parents With Only Child More Likely To Tackle Obese Kids

“Understanding changes in composition of the gut microbiome and their effects may provide new ways of diagnosing patients at particular risk of obesity before it occurs. We could then develop personalised medicine and target appropriate treatments to alter gut bacteria accordingly,” Ovadia added.

The study was presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference in the UK. (IANS)