Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×



By Rituparna Chakrobarty

The deep grief of India’s holy river Ganga (Ganges) remains unsound. The river that flows through the industrial cities of Kanpur and Kashi (Varanasi) in Uttar Pradesh is presently being treated as a natural sewer.

The condition of the river is pitiable in the city with the Ganga, in both the cities, strewn with human corpses and animal carcasses, as well as non-biodegradable trash such as poly bags, plastic bottles and worship materials like flowers, clay idols, accounts books and so on.

To add on, open defecation in the river makes the people solely responsible for it. The wallowing cattle, clothes washing, detergent usage for various purposes are some of the most common sights at the ghats. A gradual decline has been seen in the population of fishes and turtles inhabiting the river. The once-flourishing river has been declared “dead”, with no aquatic life. As for those who survive, they struggle to survive with toxic elements inside their bodies, and are not fit for human consumption as well. The river water has also caused severe health problems in both the cities of North India. Additionally, people in Varanasi can be seen polluting the river while following religious rituals.

The condition of Ganga is worsening in Kanpur due to the repulsive odour of the river. As a result, tourists avoid taking boat rides, thereby severely affecting the livelihoods of the poor working there.

However, tourists in Kashi take boat rides to taste the elegance that the city is known for. While some of the boats are manually operated, many others are operated by motor. The latter uses diesel as fuel that contributes in the city’s air, water and noise pollution.

According to a WHO report, Kanpur is the 9th most polluted city in the world. There are 23 open drains that are directly and indirectly streaming their wastes and effluents into the Ganga. Kanpur has roughly 6,500 industries including large and small-scale which deal with fertilizers, paints, chemical and detergents and throw the untreated water directly into the river. Out of these, there are 350 tanneries that also merge dirt and waste water into the river. These tanneries are largely responsible for disturbing the ecology of the water and polluting it, creating a threat to the downstream villages.

According to the norm, factories have to create a primary sewage treatment plant in their premises before dispatching water into the river for secondary treatments at sewage treatment plants. One thing to note is that the city proposed a 171 mld sewage treatment plant and it is generating 500 mld sewage every day. Only 9 mld sewage treatment plant is authorized for tanneries, but it discharges only 50 mld. Rest of the sewage directly flows into the river.

A number of proposals have been made for the cleanliness drive at Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s constituency for the campaign to clean river Ganga. But the ground realities remain completely adverse – two sewage treatment plants combined together posses the capacity of 100.5 mld, while the city produces 350 mld waste regularly. The amount of water treated is not clear.

Uma bharti, Union Water Resources Minister, assured that it will be cleaned in a “qualitative manner” within the next two years. The state government also ensured that it will support the schemes initiated by the central government.

Whether or not the promises are fulfilled, one of India’s most ancient rivers awaits a sparkling existence, with every government.


Popular

IANS

The aim of the book is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

By Siddhi Jain

Delhi-based author Pritisha Borthakur is set to release her new book, 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories'. The 1,404-word children's book was put together to address a new kind of societal debacle in the family system. The author says the aim is to teach children that families can exist in different forms, and show them how to accept the diversity in family backgrounds.

The author who named the book after her twin sons -- Puhor and Niyor -- is a parent who has seen and heard the tales of ridicule and discrimination suffered by many in India and beyond. She says the book is an artistic illustration for kids that details how different families can live and coexist. Whether it's children with two dads or two moms, children with a single dad or single mom, and even multiracial family units, Borthakur's book teaches love, understanding, and compassion towards unconventional families.

Beyond race, gender, color, and ethnicity which have formed the bases for discrimination since the beginning of time, this book aims to bring to light a largely ignored issue. For so long, single parents have been treated like a taboo without any attempt to understand their situations; no one really cares how or why one's marriage ended but just wants to treat single parents as villains simply for choosing happiness and loving their children.

Homosexual parents, a relatively new family system, is another form that has suffered hate and discrimination for many years. Pritisha emphasizes the need to understand that diversity in people and family is what makes the world beautiful and colourful. 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race, and even differences in background

four children standing on dirt during daytime 'Puhor and Niyor's Mural of Family Stories' is a firm but compassionate statement against all forms of discrimination on the bases of sexual identity, gender, race and even differences in background. | Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash


Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Lina Trochez on Unsplash

Clean and maintained hands boost confidence in daily life activities.

If you feel that clean and well-groomed hands are just an essential prerequisite for women, you might like to think twice. Men should equally pay attention to their hands because our hand houses 1,500 bacteria living on each square centimeter of its skin. You can easily assume what havoc it can create in our body because in India we have the culture of eating with our hands and spaces beneath nails can become breeding heaven for germs. Moreover, clean and maintained hands boost confidence in their daily life activities. Therefore, it's important to keep your hands clean irrespective of your gender by washing or sanitizing at regular intervals. And, to keep them groomed, you don't have to visit a salon.

Rajesh U Pandya, Managing Director, KAI India, gives easy and completely doable tips to follow at home:

* Refrain from harsh soaps: You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. Your soap can have a moisturizing element in it like aloe vera or shea butter. Ensure that you're washing your hands with normal water as hot water can make your hand's skin dry and scaly.

Soap bars organic You should be mindful of the soap you are using to wash your hands. | Photo by Aurélia Dubois on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Dmitry Demidko on Unsplash

Bitcoin has become an essential crypto asset in modern portfolios and investment funds.

Bitcoin has become an essential crypto asset in modern portfolios and investment funds. The confidence generated in this cryptocurrency will depend a lot on the diversification that companies make in their balance sheets in Bitcoin and the increase of institutional investors that allocate a percentage of their funds in this crypto. American fund manager Cathie Wood makes some interesting predictions, both in the rise that the Bitcoin price will experience in the next 5 years, suggesting these institutional investors allocate 5% of their funds; this will help leverage the Bitcoin market.

Bitcoin will grow by a tenfold

Keep reading... Show less