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Gear Up Indian Women Writers! Time to Call for Celebration on August 24

The festival is likely to call attention to gender issues, creativity, issues revolving around feminism

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women writers
Woman opening a sheet. Pixabay

Bengaluru, Aug 22, 2017: In today’s era, it would be wrong to say that there is a dearth of female writers or no female writers at all. From illustrated novels to mythology and humorous copies to science fiction — it would be a mistake to pigeonhole these writing styles as the male-centric. Definitely not when there are a plethora of women writers existent in this domain.

Here is a chance to all the women authors out there to showcase their talent to the city with an initiative called “SheThePeople”. It is a storytelling platform that invigorates women to swap ideas and work in a well-accorded manner.

[bctt tweet=”The Women Writers’ Fest is being organised primarily for the first time in Bengaluru on August 24. ” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

Also Read: Women Writers’ Festival will discuss issues that shape Women Professionals in the 21st Century 

Pronouncing it as a  celebration of the Indian women writers, publishers, storytellers, editors and novelist, the communications consultant Rupali Mehra, also associated with the event, stated: “We have conducted two events in Delhi and Mumbai. Bengaluru was chosen this time as it has produced talented women authors and poets and has a vibrant reading culture,” mentioned The Hindu report.

The event will witness the participation of writers including Sowmya Aji, Shinie Antony, Jahnavi Barua, Jane De Suza, Priyanka Pathak Narain and Gita Aravamudan.

The founder of SheThePeople, Shaili Chopra said: “The idea was to give rise to a platform where we give women voices the majority. That said, our programmes are not restricted to just women. We encourage men to be part of this dialogue”.

The event is reported to have panel discussions on women writing humour, women bloggers, short stories, children’s literature, and mythology among others. The festival will put the spotlight on gender issues, feminism, creativity, and narratives created by women to define their space.

The festival is likely to call attention to gender issues, creativity, issues revolving around feminism, anecdotes devised by women to mark their space.

Author and blogger Kiran Manral on the need for an event focussing only women said: “Women writers need a space where they can discuss issues that inform their writing which can be different from what male writers face. A festival like this provides a warm nurturing space to have these conversations.”


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Bilingual Children are Strong, Creative Storytellers; Says New Study

"However, this research shows that as a function of storytelling, bilingual children are equally strong as monolingual children," Nicoladis added

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This research used a new, highly sensitive measure for examining cognitive flexibility, examining a participant's ability to switch between games with different rules, while maintaining accuracy and reaction time. Pixabay

Bilingual children use as many words as monolingual children when telling a story, and demonstrate high levels of cognitive flexibility, a new study suggests.

“We found that the number of words that bilingual children use in their stories is highly correlated with their cognitive flexibility–the ability to switch between thinking about different concepts,” said study lead author Elena Nicoladis from University of Alberta in Canada.

“This suggests that bilinguals are adept at using the medium of storytelling. The results suggest that parents of bilingual children do not need to be concerned about long-term school achievement,” Nicoladis said in a paper published in the journal Language, Cognition and Neuroscience.

“In a storytelling context, bilingual kids are able to use this flexibility to convey stories in creative ways,” Nicoladis added.

The researchers examined a group of French-English bilingual children who have been taught two languages since birth, rather than learning a second language later in life.

Results show that bilingual children used just as many words to tell a story in English as monolingual children.

Bilingual kids attain cognitive and perceptional benefits
Bilingual children have superior emotional and cerebral control than monolingual peers. Pixabay

Participants also used just as many words in French as they did in English when telling a story.

According to the researchers, previous research has shown that bilingual children score lower than monolingual children on traditional vocabulary tests, meaning this results are changing our understanding of multiple languages and cognition in children.

This research used a new, highly sensitive measure for examining cognitive flexibility, examining a participant’s ability to switch between games with different rules, while maintaining accuracy and reaction time.

This study builds on previous research examining vocabulary in bilingual children who have learned English as a second language.

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“Learning a word is related to how much time you spend in each language. For bilingual children, time is split between languages. So, unsurprisingly, they tend to have lower vocabularies in each of their languages,” Nicoladis said.

“However, this research shows that as a function of storytelling, bilingual children are equally strong as monolingual children,” Nicoladis added. (IANS)