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Gene showing opposite effect on some colorectal cancers

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New York: A gene that suppress the increase of many types of cancer is showing opposite effect in some forms of colorectal cancer, an Indian origin scientist said.

The research could lay the foundation for new colorectal cancer treatments.

“The gene is known as Sprouty2 has previously been shown to protect against metastasis, or the spreading of cancer to other parts of the body, in the breast, prostate and liver cancer,” said Sharad Khare, associate professor at University of Missouri School of Medicine in the US.

“However, our recent molecular studies found that this gene may actually help promote metastasis ( a spread of the disease to another organ) instead of suppressing it,” Khare noted.

For more than three years, Khare studied Sprouty2 in cancer cell models, mouse models and human biopsy samples.

Using different molecular methods, the researchers found that the gene functions differently in colorectal cancer than in other types of cancers.

Sprouty2 is known to block molecular circuits to prevent cancer cells from growing and spreading to other parts of the body.

However, the researchers found that in colorectal cancer, Sprouty2 may increase the ability of cancer cells to spread instead of suppressing it.

Khare believes this occurs when the gene is up-regulated or supercharged.

“This finding is a very significant step in our understanding of metastasis in colorectal cancer, but it’s important to note that we believe this phenomenon may occur in only a subset of colorectal cancer patients,” Khare said.

The findings appeared in the journal Oncogene.(IANS)(image:cellcan.com)

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Meditation Improves Mood, Sleep in Teenagers with Cancer

The mindfulness-based interventions for teenagers with cancer appear as a promising option to lighten psychological inconveniences of living with cancer

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meditation
The process focuses on the present moment and the connection between the mind and body. Pixabay

Daily meditation can help improve mood and sleep in teenagers suffering or recuperating from cancer, a promising research shows.

Mindfulness-based meditation could lessen some symptoms associated with cancer in teenagers, according to the results of a clinical trial intervention led by researchers at University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children’s hospital.

The process focuses on the present moment and the connection between the mind and body.

Adolescents living with cancer face not only the physical symptoms of their condition but also the anxiety and uncertainty related to the progression of the disease and the anticipation of physical and emotional pain related to illness and treatment.

meditation
Daily meditation can help improve mood and sleep in teenagers suffering or recuperating from cancer. Pixabay

The researchers asked 13 adolescents with cancer to complete questionnaires covering mood (positive and negative emotions, anxiety and depression), sleep and quality of life.
The group was divided in two. The first group of eight adolescents were offered eight mindfulness-based meditation sessions and the remaining five adolescents in the control group were put on a wait-list.

After the last meditation session, patients from both groups filled out the same questionnaires a second time.

Also Read: Daily Meditation may keep you attentive in old age

“We found that teenagers that participated in the mindfulness group had lower scores in depression after our eight sessions. Girls from the mindfulness group reported sleeping better. We also noticed that they developed mindfulness skills to a greater extent than boys during the sessions,” explained Catherine Malboeuf-Hurtubise from University of Montreal.

The mindfulness-based interventions for teenagers with cancer appear as a promising option to lighten psychological inconveniences of living with cancer, she added. (IANS)

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