Monday July 23, 2018

Gene Therapy may Help Treat Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic kidney disease is a slowly progressive disease, so that is an advantage

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Gene Therapy may Help Treat Chronic Kidney Disease
Gene Therapy may Help Treat Chronic Kidney Disease. Pixabay
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Scientists have found that administering gene therapy may reverse damage in kidney cells, suggesting a potential treatment for chronic kidney disease characterised by gradual loss of its functions.

The research showed that whether adeno-associated virus (AAV) — a relative of the virus that causes the common cold — could deliver genetic material to damaged cells in the kidneys.

They explained that diabetes, hypertension and other conditions cause chronic kidney disease, which occurs when damaged kidneys cannot effectively filter waste and excess fluids from the body.

“Chronic kidney disease is an enormous and growing problem. Unfortunately, over the years, we have not developed more effective drugs for the condition, and this reality is leading us to explore gene therapy,” said Benjamin D. Humphreys from the Division of Nephrology at Washington University in the US.

gene
Gene (Representational image). IANS

In the study, published in Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the team evaluated six AAV viruses, both natural and synthetic, in mice and in stem-cell-derived human kidney organoids.

A synthetic virus, Anc80, created by the researchers proved successful in reaching two types of cells that contribute to chronic kidney disease by secreting proteins that gum up the organ and cause irreversible damage.

The results showed that the genetic material carried by Anc80 was transferred successfully to the targeted kidney cells and the same virus was also used in gene therapy strategies to treat mice with kidney scarring.

Also Read: Parkinson’s Identified Gene to Combat Alzheimer’s

“The interesting thing about the adeno-associated viruses is that they persist in the body for many months, potentially giving a therapeutic gene a chance to do its work,” Humphreys explained.

“Chronic kidney disease is a slowly progressive disease, so that is an advantage. After many more years of research, we could envision that patients would need injections maybe twice a year as opposed to every week, like with chemo,” Humphreys added. (IANS)

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Can Bariatric Surgery Prevent Kidney Disease?

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Bariatric Surgery
representational image. Pixabay

Undergoing bariatric surgery may significantly lower the risk of developing severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, according to a study.

Obesity is a dangerous condition and goes hand in hand with elevated blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases and Type-2 diabetes, which in turn may lead to complications such as chronic kidney disease.

Obesity is also an independent risk factor in developing chronic kidney disease. Different obesity treatment strategies include lifestyle interventions, dietary modification, pharmacological and surgical treatment.

ALSO READ: How weight-loss surgery can avoid death

Bariatric Surgery
Half of the patients received weight-loss surgery, and the other half were treated with conventional non-surgical methods in the primary health care. Pixabay

The findings showed that patients with evidence of kidney damage — high levels of protein in the urine — benefited most from surgical treatment, indicating that surgery prevents progression of pre-existing kidney injury towards renal failure.

“The study reported long-term effects of bariatric surgery compared to usual obesity care on incidence of end-stage renal disease alone and in combination with chronic kidney disease stage 4,” said A. Shulman, from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

ALSO READ: Why You Feel Hungrier After Weight Loss

These results add to a large body of evidence which demonstrates that bariatric surgery, reduces mortality, improves type 2 diabetes and prevents cardiovascular disease and cancer, the researchers added. IANS

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