Saturday February 16, 2019

Genetics May Play Big Role In Kid’s Snacking Patterns

The children with the genetic variant related to fat taste sensitivity were found to consume snacks with higher energy density

0
//
genes
Your uncle's genes may decide your longevity: Study. Pixabay

Parents, take note! The types of snacks a child chooses could be linked to genetics, a new study has claimed.

The researcher investigated whether genetic variants in taste receptors related to sweet preference, fat taste sensitivity, and aversion to bitter green leafy vegetables influenced the snacks chosen by the study participants.

They found that nearly 80 percent of the study participants carried at least one of these potential at-risk genotypes that could predispose them to poor snacking habits.

ALSO READ: App to help scientists study cancer genetics

“Kids are eating a lot more snacks now than they used to, and we think to look at how genetics can be related to snacking behavior is important to understanding increased obesity among kids,” said Elie Chamoun from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

“This new research could help parents understand how their kids taste and tailor their diet for better nutritional choices,” Chamoun added.

genetic
The researchers also tested the participants’ saliva to determine their genetic taste profile. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Scientists Use Pocket-size Device to Map Human Genetic Code

They discovered that kids with a sweet tooth, who have the gene related to sweet taste preference, ate snacks with significantly more calories from sugar. They also ate those snacks mostly in the evening.

“It’s likely these kids snacked more in the evening because that’s when they are at home and have more access to foods with high sugar,” said Chamoun.

The children with the genetic variant related to fat taste sensitivity were found to consume snacks with higher energy density. People with this genetic variant may have a low oral sensitivity to fat and therefore consume more fatty foods without sensing it, the researcher said. (IANS)

Next Story

Tooth Decay Can Be Caused Due To Excess Use Of Toothpaste: Study

Young kids may push for independence in brushing their teeth, but kids' toothpaste tastes sweet, according to the team.

0
A patient for a regular check up of their teeth.
Picture shows a person's teeth being checked upon.

Many young kids who use toothpaste more than needed are at an increased risk of dental fluorosis when they get older, warns a new study.

Fluorosis is a condition that affects the teeth caused by overexposure to fluoride during the first eight years of life.

Fluoride is a mineral found in water and soil. More than 70 years ago, scientists discovered that people whose drinking water naturally had more fluoride also had fewer cavities. That led to addition of fluoride to tap water, toothpaste, mouthwash and other products.

 

Common Toothpaste Ingredient May Promote Colon Cancer
Common Toothpaste Ingredient May Promote Colon Cancer. Pixabay

However, the study showed that when teeth are forming, too much fluoride can lead to tooth streaking or spottiness or dental fluorosis.

In addition, the study found that although experts recommend no more than a pea-sized amount, about 40 per cent of kids aged three to six used a brush that was full or half-full of toothpaste.

“Fluoride is a wonderful benefit but it needs to be used carefully,” Mary Hayes, pediatric dentist in Chicago was quoted by Daily Mail.

For the study, the researchers from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention included parents of more than 5,000 kids ages three to 15.

Poor dental health may lead to risk of diabetes. Pixabay
Young kids may push for independence in brushing their teeth, but kids’ toothpaste tastes sweet, according to the team. Pixabay

Although the researchers did not determine how many kids developed streaked or spotty teeth as a result of using too much toothpaste, they recommended children under three are only supposed to use a smear of toothpaste the size of a grain of rice, reported Daily Mail.

Kids aged three to six should keep it to a pea-sized amount.

Also Read: This Bengal Teacher Collects, Cooks Food to Feed The Poor Kids

Young kids may push for independence in brushing their teeth, but kids’ toothpaste tastes sweet, according to the team.

“You don’t want them eating it like food. We want the parent to be in charge of the toothbrush and the toothpaste,” noted Hayes. (IANS)