German Translation of a Book on Indian Ancient Wisdom

A book on ancient Indian wisdom is now being translated into German language

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Caroline Hagen german translation
Ms. Caroline Hagen, a german scholar will be translating the book in the German language.

A book on Indian wisdom, which has been formally prefaced by NASA Chief scientists and authored by the researcher Shri Salil Gewali of Meghalaya, is now is going to be translated into the German language by a scholar from Germany – Ms. Caroline Hagen. Another scholar from Berlin, Germany —  Mr. Max Herz has offered to assist in editing the book. When Ms. Caroline got Gewali’s book some months back, she was overwhelmed with joy as she got in the book most of the information about the opinions of Arthur Schopenhauer and German Nobel laureate Harman Hesse on ancient knowledge of India. Harman Hesse is highly celebrated for his novel – “Siddhartha” which is set in Indian doctrine of salvation and the philosophy of karma of Buddhism. Very Interestingly, Harman Hesse dedicated a part of his Siddhartha novel to a renowned French laureate Romain Rolland who again was deeply inspired by the wisdom of Vedanta of ancient India. A yoga enthusiast, Ms Caroline instantly resonate with what Gewali’s book set out — particularly the influence of Upanishads in Germany and other European countries in 19th Century.  

german translation
The book by Salil Gewali showcases how the ancient wisdom of India inspired great minds and the same book will be translated in the German language.

Caroline Hagen comments – “I am very proud to be able to translate Salil Gewali’s book into German. Despite the modern western culture’s affection to old Indian practices, particularly the wisdom related to yoga and meditation, very few know about the influence Indian philosophy that has had upon ‘our’ most popular thinkers like Schopenhauer, Johann Goethe, and Hesse. These great literary figures have stated at places that their work couldn’t have existed without the influence of the Upanishads and the work of Kalidasa like Shakuntala.” No wonder, Albert Einstein always looked upon Arthur Schopenhauer for inspiration.   

The search-based book by Salil Gewali showcases in the words of the world-renowned thinkers, writers and scientists that how the ancient wisdom of Indian inspired them and became immensely instrumental in their researches and discoveries.

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‘GREAT MINDS ON INDIA’ has won the worldwide appreciation. Edited by another NASA scientist – Prof. AV Murali of Houston, USA, the book has already been translated into Eleven languages. The titles in various regional languages has been formally launched by the Governors and Chief Minister of the respective states in the country.    

 

 

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J.K. Rowling Launches Bedtime Stories ‘The Ickabog’ Online

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JK Rowling
JK Rowling launched the online serialisation of a new 34-part series, 'The Ickabog'. Pixabay

Breaking new ground, J.K. Rowling, the creator of the immensely popular Harry Potter series, on Tuesday launched the online serialisation of a new 34-part series, ‘The Ickabog’, aimed primarily at 7-9-year-olds as bedtime stories but which will appeal to readers of all ages. Simultaneously, she launched a global completion for the illustrations that will appear in the print edition that will appear in November and announced she would donate the entire royalties to projects that assist groups particularly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the world.

“Written to be read aloud, ‘The Ickabog’ is a fairy tale, set in an imaginary land, and is a complete stand-alone story unrelated to the author’s other work. It will appeal to children between the ages of 7 and 9 but can be enjoyed by the whole family. The story will be translated into a number of other languages. “The idea for ‘The Ickabog’ came to me while I was still writing Harry Potter. I wrote most of a first draft in fits and starts between Potter books, intending to publish it after ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows’,” Rowling said in a post on a website.

However, after the last Potter book, she wanted to take a break from publishing, which ended up lasting five years as she decided she wanted to step away from children’s books for a while. At that point, the first draft of “The Ickabog” was in the attic, where it remained for nearly a decade. “Over time, I came to think of it as a story that belonged to my two younger children, because I’d read it to them in the evenings when they were little, which has always been a happy family memory.

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J.K. Rowling’s ‘The Ickabog’ bedtime stories released online. Pixabay

“A few weeks ago at dinner, I tentatively mooted the idea of getting ‘The Ickabog’ down from the attic and publishing it for free, for children in lockdown. My now teenagers were touchingly enthusiastic, so downstairs came the very dusty box, and for the last few weeks I’ve been immersed in a fictional world I thought I’d never enter again. “As I worked to finish the book, I started reading chapters nightly to the family again. This was one of the most extraordinary experiences of my writing life, as ‘The Ickabog’s’ first two readers told me what they remember from when they were tiny, and demanded the reinstatement of bits they’d particularly liked. I obeyed,” Rowling said.

Having decided to publish, she thought “how wonderful” it would be if children in lockdown, or otherwise needing distraction during the strange and difficult time we’re passing through, illustrated the story. “There will be suggestions about the illustrations we might need for each chapter on ‘The Ickabog’ website, but nobody should feel constrained by these ideas. I want to see imaginations run wild! Creativity, inventiveness and effort are the most important things: we aren’t necessarily looking for the most technical skill,” Rowling explained.

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Parents and guardians are encouraged to enter their children’s artwork into an official illustration competition being run by Rowling’s publishers around the world, to win a place in the published book in each territory. The competition was launched on Tuesday in India, the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, the US and Canada. Other territories will follow shortly. Rowling will not be part of the judging process but will be suggesting scenes and characters to draw on a daily basis during the online serialisation. (IANS)

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Read This Article If You Are a Book Lover

A book lover's trail

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book lovers Airbnb
Airbnb has recently unveiled a novel way to travel and imbibe your favourite read for book lovers this spring. Pixabay

Airbnb has recently unveiled a novel way to travel and imbibe your favourite reads this spring. Guests can choose from a collection of Online Experiences that celebrate all things literary.

While communities around the world continue to shelter at home, Airbnb will allow guests to connect virtually over their shared love of books, alongside bestselling authors and passionate hosts.

Whether it’s to reconnect with your book club friends or to re-inspire story time with your children, Airbnb Experiences offers an array of virtual options, including learning the secrets of Pasta Grannies with cookbook author Vicky Bennison, making a mini pop-out book, enjoying story time with drag queens, and novel writing with a bestselling author.

book lovers Airbnb
Along with Online Experiences, book-themed listings on Airbnb may inspire storytime moments with your loved ones at home. Pixabay

Online Experiences include:

Family Storytime with Crafts and Cats (Brooklyn, New York)

Write Inspired by Intuition (Los Angeles, California)

Memoir Writing Workshop (Temp, Arizona)

Small Space Designing with Whitney Leigh Morris (Los Angeles, California)

Story Time with an Award-Winning Author (Atlanta, Georgia)

Write the Book You’ve Always Wanted To (Sydney, Australia)

Propagating Plants with Plant Care Author Hilton Carter (Baltimore, Maryland)

Tequila Mockingbird Cocktail Making (London, UK)

book lovers Airbnb
Whether it’s to reconnect with your book club friends or to re-inspire story time with your children, Airbnb Experiences offers an array of virtual options. Pixabay

Storytime with Universal Standard (New York, New York)

Therapeutic Book Club with a TV Writer (Los Angeles, California)

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Guests can travel to different destinations, cross cultural bridges and meet new people, all from the comfort of home and through the magic of books. Along with Online Experiences, book-themed listings on Airbnb may inspire storytime moments with your loved ones at home. Refresh your reading nooks or create the perfect #shelfie by drawing from these cozy homes that are primed for curling up with a good read. (IANS)

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Penning a Book Doesn’t Make an Author Immortal: Ruskin Bond

"From a love of reading, comes writing," says Ruskin Bond

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Ruskin Bond
Much-loved and widely-read author Ruskin Bond believes that it's from a love of reading that a writer comes to a love of writing. Wikimedia Commons

BY SIDDHI JAIN

Much-loved and widely-read author Ruskin Bond believes that it’s from a love of reading that a writer comes to a love of writing, and penning a book does not always translate to the author becoming immortal.

“There’s only one way to become a writer, that’s to be a reader. If you look at the lives of all writers who are successful, you’d find that when they were boys or girls, they were readers and bookworms. It’s from a love of reading that you come to a love of writing.

“Writers do get forgotten. Sometimes we think writing a book gives us some sort of immortality, I assure you it doesn’t. Ninety-nine percent of writers over the ages have been forgotten, you don’t know that some of them have been very good?. Writing is something you do anyway, regardless of whether it is going to make you rich or famous around the world or in your country,” Bond, 85, said at Arth, a cultural fest, in the national capital.

Ruskin Bond
Ruskin Bond has previously pointed to a dwindling reader base, but feels that there is enough audience for good writers to help them thrive. Wikimedia Commons

Landour-based Bond, an Indian author of British descent and a Padma Bhushan awardee, published his first novel “The Room on the Roof”, the semi-autobiographical story of the orphaned Anglo-Indian boy named Rusty, at the age of 17, which won the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize (1957).

I did begin writing very early, and writing somehow wasn’t very fashionable back in the 1950s when I finished school. Today I keep meeting youngsters and even oldsters who want to write and are writing books. It seems to be the in-thing.

“?But when I finished school, writing wasn’t popular as a profession. But I was determined to be a writer, and when I came home, and my mother asked, Ruskin what are you going to do with yourself now, I said Mum, I’m going to be a writer, she said, Don’t be silly, go and join the army,” shared Bond.

How far do awards go in contributing to the work of an author?

Ruskin Bond
“A lot of parents complain that children spend more time on electronic media and don’t read enough, but you see, reading has always been a minority pastime,” says Ruskin Bond. Wikimedia Commons

“I don’t think in the long run, awards have made much difference. If you are a good writer, and you have a good readership, then prizes and awards along the way are nice to have on your mantelpiece, but they are not going to make a great difference to your work.?”?

With more than seven decades into writing, does the great author have a writing ritual?

“I think most writers try to write something everyday, you need a certain discipline to get through the assignment you have been given, or to complete a novel. I try to write a page or two every morning, but it’s not compulsory.”

Bond has previously pointed to a dwindling reader base, but feels that there is enough audience for good writers to help them thrive.

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“A lot of parents complain that children spend more time on electronic media and don’t read enough, but you see, reading has always been a minority pastime. Even when I was a boy, in a class of 30-35 boys, there were just 2 or 3 of us who were fond of reading.

“At that time, education in English in India was confined to a few schools, and maybe to the upper classes, but today it has spread significantly throughout the country.” (IANS)