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GES 2017 : Ivanka Trump in Hyderabad charms the women centric Global Entrepreneurship Summit co-hosted by India and United States

Being invited by Prime Minister Modi, Ivanka Trump is in Hyderabad for GES 2017. The event is focused on women entrepreneurs from all across the globe, this is the first time GES is being held in South Asian country

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Ivanka Trump visited India for GES 2017
Ivanka Trump in Hyderabad (VOA)
  • Praising Prime Minister Narendra Modi at GES 2017, Ivanka Trump said,”from your childhood selling tea to becoming PM, you’ve proven that transformational change is possible.”

  • Prime Minister Modi emphasising on bilateral relations said,”the GES 2017 event not only connects the Silicon Valley with Hyderabad but also showcases the close ties between the US and India.”

Ivanka Trump, daughter and adviser to US President Donald Trump arrived Hyderabad to attend Global Entrepreneurship Summit, GES 2017 co-hosted by India and the United States. The three-day summit, from November 28-30, is being held at the Hyderabad International Convention Centre (HICC) and Hyderabad International Trade Expositions (Hitex).

Ivanka Trump in Hyderabad
Ivanka Trump, daughter of U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during the Global Entrepreneurship Summit (VOA)

Ms Ivanka Trump is leading a delegation of senior White House officials and American entrepreneurs. The theme of this year’s summit is ‘Women First, Prosperity for All’ and will include 1,200 young entrepreneurs from different parts of the world, mostly women.

“I encourage everyone here to come together, learn from each other and find new ways to lift barriers in our society so that women are free to innovate, empowered to succeed and able to leave our children a brighter future,” Ivanka Trump told delegates in the event’s opening speech Tuesday.

Ivanka’s appearance with Modi at the opening of GES 2017 was preceded by a bilateral meeting which the Prime Minister Modi described as “wonderful”, before they went out to meet entrepreneurs who showcased their work for presentation. Being women centric event, two of the India’s most powerful women External affairs minister Sushma Swaraj and Defense minister Nirmala Sitharaman were also present.

GES 2017 : Ivanka Trump in India
Ivanka Trump with Prime Minister Modi (Narendra Modi Twitter)

The summit began with cultural events showcasing India’s rich culture. This year’s summit theme clearly demonstrated the commitment of the India and United states to the principle that when women are economically empowered, their communities and countries thrive. India is one of the country where women are at highest pedestals in social and professional life.

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Ivanka also gave credit to the Modi government for lifting 130 million people out of poverty. “Women still face steep obstacles in starting, owning and growing their businesses. We must ensure women entrepreneurs have access to capital, access to networks and mentors,” Ivanka said to loud cheers from a packed enthusiastic audience.

Ivanka’s visit also affirms that the Trump administration sees India as a major strategic partner in south asia and wants to engage with India more. Growing trade and business between India and United States sends a strong signal to the world.

by SHAURYA RITWIK, Shaurya is Sub-Editor at NewsGram and writes on Geo-politcs, Culture, Indology and Business. Twitter Handle – @shauryaritwik

  • francislmonteiro

    Ramdevji can you tell us why MNC needed .You shout MNC loot us .NOT a worg comes out now

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Small Business Owners Start Wellness Programs

Small Businesses Embrace Wellness to Help Retain Staffers

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Many small business owners are starting wellness programs to help employees be healthier, happier and more likely to stay. Pixabay

Every month, the 30 staffers at Chris Boehlke’s public relations firm each get $100 to pay for anything that contributes to their wellness. And not just for typical expenditures like gym memberships or yoga classes.

“You can get nails done, anything you feel is helping your overall well being,” says Boehlke, co-owner of San Francisco-based Bospar. The company also has flex time and a generous time off policy including 17 paid holidays each year.

As a result, Boehlke says, the 5-year-old company has lost only two staffers.

Many small business owners or startups are starting wellness programs to help employees be healthier, happier and more likely to stay.

Wellness efforts encompass a wide range of benefits and services, including gym subsidies, stipends for classes and activities and apps that help motivate staffers to exercise and take care of themselves.

Owners are aware that many big companies have wellness programs, an advantage when it comes to recruiting and retaining staffers.

Rob Wilson sees interest in wellness programs growing among his small business clients, and his company, human resources provider Employco, is focusing more on these programs.

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Brent Frederick, founder of Jester Concepts, a restaurant group in Minneapolis poses at P.S. Steak. Frederick puts a 3% voluntary surcharge on guest checks to help pay for health insurance and mental health services and says almost all guests agree to pay it. VOA

“A lot of it so far has been online classes and health coaching, also a lot of online tools right now that employees can access anywhere to help them keep track of what they’re doing,” says Wilson, whose company is based in Westmont, Illinois.

“The companies doing it are really interested in keeping their employees,” he says.

Work can take a toll

They also want to care for staffers who can be sacrificing good health habits by working long and hard hours. At MonetizeMore, an advertising technology company, CEO Kean Graham has sensed that the sedentary lifestyle of his more than 100 staffers has taken a toll. He’s seen extended absences and depression, and staffers have said that they’ve gained weight.

“We came up with a steps program that measures everybody’s number of steps per month via their smart watches or apps on their phones,” says Graham, whose company is based in Victoria, British Columbia. After several months, he saw an improvement in absenteeism and spirits.

The 100 employees at Birch Coffee get stipends toward a variety of wellness activities, and the company pays for monthly massages at its 14 New York stores. Birch is trying to offset the physical and mental stress staffers encounter, co-founder Jeremy Lyman says.

“Each barista engages with hundreds of people every day,” Lyman says. “Mentally, it can take its toll, and you’re standing on your feet for seven hours.”

Encourage good health

Some owners sign up with companies that run structured wellness programs. These can include encouraging staffers to take care of their health with weight-loss and smoking cessation aids, health screening and coaching and apps to track steps, calories and other metrics. Some businesses have point systems and competitions to reward staffers.

Nearly all the 86 employees at Connor & Gallagher OneSource take part in its program created by a wellness software company, says Kayla Roeske, the director of client wellness at the Lisle, Illinois-based human resources and employee benefits firm. She finds that staffers are more likely to participate fully when the program is presented to them in a positive way, rather than the company coming across as “Big Brother” trying to control them. The company doesn’t get individual data but instead “we can see aggregate data from an organizational standpoint that tells us where we are year to year,” she says.

Avoid cheerleading 

Owners need to steer clear of being overbearing and negative about employees’ health. While a boss might be happier if staffers didn’t smoke or if they lost weight, if the company comes across as intrusive, it could lose good employees.

“If you start to push decision-making and judgment on these things, that’s where you may begin to cross the line,” says David Lewis, CEO of OperationsInc, an HR provider based in Norwalk, Connecticut. He advises that owners offer education and make tools available, but avoid too much cheerleading.

“If you say, `we want you to live a better life,’ to some extent employees are going to take that, but they’ll be skeptical if it’s syrupy,” Lewis says. He suggests owners speak to staffers about realities, like the need to lower health insurance costs.

Owners may need to be creative about funding their wellness efforts, especially when they include health insurance, a benefit many small businesses can’t afford. Brent Frederick, founder of Jester Concepts, a Minneapolis restaurant operator, includes a voluntary 3% surcharge on guest checks to pay for health and mental health insurance.

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A line item shows an example of how the charge that Brent Frederick, founder of Jester Concepts, a restaurant group in Minneapolis uses as a 3% voluntary surcharge on guest checks to help pay for health insurance and mental health services and says almost all guests agree to pay it. VOA

‘A better business’

Frederick has 250 employees among his four establishments, which include restaurants, a food truck and a sports arena concession. Even the part-timers get coverage. That has made Jester Concepts a more competitive employer.

“We’ve been able to retain employees and be a better business in the community,” Frederick says.

The majority of Jester Concepts’ customers are willing to pay the 3% surcharge, which amounts to $3 on a $100 check. Some question it, but Frederick estimates that no more than once a month at each location does a guest ask to have it taken off their bill. Customers can look at the surcharge as proof that the company is concerned about its staffers’ well-being.

Owners who want healthier employees may have to set a good example, and even make some changes to office routine and policies.

A boss who likes to keep cola and other highly sugared beverages in the break room fridge may need to stop stocking it.  And at companies where the culture is for everyone to work through lunch at their desks, there may need to be a new normal — staffers have to break away.

At Hoppier, an Ottawa, Ontario-based company that delivers snacks and supplies to businesses, “we don’t let anyone eat behind their computer screens. We think that everyone deserves a proper break, so we ask them to eat somewhere that doesn’t require any work,” CEO Cassy Aite says.

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Aite used to work at a consulting firm and eat at his desk; it’s what people did. His next job was at a German company, where he learned a very different approach — talking 90 minutes away from the office each day for lunch.

“It’s an amazing way to break up the day,” says Aite. (VOA)