Monday April 22, 2019

Get Married to Have Better Bones!

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women

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Get Married to Have Better Bones!
Get Married to Have Better Bones! Pixabay

Are you 25 or older? Getting married won’t be a bad idea for the health of your bones, especially spinal ones.

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), found evidence that men who married when they were younger than 25 had lower bone strength than men who married for the first time at a later age.

“This is the first time that marriage has been linked to bone health,” said senior author Carolyn Crandall, professor of medicine at UCLA.

“There is very little known about the influence of social factors – other than socio-economic factors – on bone health,” Crandall added.

Among men who first married prior to turning 25, the researchers found a significant reduction in spine bone strength for each year they were married before that age.

Also, men in stable marriages or marriage-like relationships who had never previously divorced or separated had greater bone strength than men whose previous marriages had fractured, the researchers said.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

And those in stable relationships also had stronger bones than men who never married, said the study published in the journal Osteoporosis International.

The researchers used data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study, which recruited participants between the ages 25 and 75 in 1995-96.

Participants from that study were re-interviewed in 2004-05 (MIDUS II).

Also Read: Sex Hormone Levels Linked to Heart Disease in Post-Menopausal Women

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women.

They also took into consideration other factors that influence bone health, such as medications, health behaviours and menopause.

“The associations between marriage and bone health were evident in the spine but not the hip, possibly due to differences in bone composition,” Crandall said.

“Very early marriage was detrimental in men, likely because of the stresses of having to provide for a family,” said study co-author Arun Karlamangla, a professor of medicine in the geriatrics division at the Geffen School. (IANS)

Next Story

Exposure to Dim Light Escalates Breast Cancer’s Spread to Bones

X-ray images showed that mice exposed to a light or dim light cycle had much larger tumours and increased bone damage compared with mice kept in a standard light/dark cycle

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Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Exposure to dim light at night may contribute to spreading of breast cancer to bones, researchers have shown in an animal study.

When breast cancer spreads it often affects bones, cause severe pain and make them fragile. “To date no one has reported that exposure to dim light at night induces circadian disruption, which increases spread of bone metastatic breast cancer,” said Muralidharan Anbalagan, Assistant Professor, at Tulane University in New Orleans.

The findings were presented at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society’s annual meeting in New Orleans.

For the preliminary study, the team created a mouse model of bone metastatic breast cancer. They injected oestrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer cells, which have a low propensity to grow in bones, into the tibia (shinbone) of female mice.

Cancer patient
Cancer patient.

Like humans, mice produced a strong night-time circadian melatonin signal, shown to produce strong anti-cancer actions and for promoting sleep.

While one group of mice was kept in the light for 12 hours each day, the other group of three mice in the dark for 12 hours. Another group spent 12 hours in light, followed by 12 hours in dim light at night.

Also Read- Connecting to Free Wi-Fi can Expose your Data to Hackers

X-ray images showed that mice exposed to a light or dim light cycle had much larger tumours and increased bone damage compared with mice kept in a standard light/dark cycle, he noted.

“Our research identified the importance of an intact nocturnal circadian melatonin anti-cancer signal in suppressing bone-metastatic breast tumour growth,” Anbalagan said. (IANS)