Thursday October 18, 2018

Get Married to Have Better Bones!

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women

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Get Married to Have Better Bones!
Get Married to Have Better Bones! Pixabay
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Are you 25 or older? Getting married won’t be a bad idea for the health of your bones, especially spinal ones.

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), found evidence that men who married when they were younger than 25 had lower bone strength than men who married for the first time at a later age.

“This is the first time that marriage has been linked to bone health,” said senior author Carolyn Crandall, professor of medicine at UCLA.

“There is very little known about the influence of social factors – other than socio-economic factors – on bone health,” Crandall added.

Among men who first married prior to turning 25, the researchers found a significant reduction in spine bone strength for each year they were married before that age.

Also, men in stable marriages or marriage-like relationships who had never previously divorced or separated had greater bone strength than men whose previous marriages had fractured, the researchers said.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

And those in stable relationships also had stronger bones than men who never married, said the study published in the journal Osteoporosis International.

The researchers used data from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study, which recruited participants between the ages 25 and 75 in 1995-96.

Participants from that study were re-interviewed in 2004-05 (MIDUS II).

Also Read: Sex Hormone Levels Linked to Heart Disease in Post-Menopausal Women

Specifically, the authors used hip and spine bone-density measurements and other data to examine the relationship between bone health and marriage in 294 men and 338 women.

They also took into consideration other factors that influence bone health, such as medications, health behaviours and menopause.

“The associations between marriage and bone health were evident in the spine but not the hip, possibly due to differences in bone composition,” Crandall said.

“Very early marriage was detrimental in men, likely because of the stresses of having to provide for a family,” said study co-author Arun Karlamangla, a professor of medicine in the geriatrics division at the Geffen School. (IANS)

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Here’s How Marriage Can Protect You From Malnutrition in Old Age

According Volkert, a lack of appetite, which is often perceived as a key cause of malnutrition, was of no relevance.

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Marriage
Can marriage protect against malnutrition in old age? Check it out here. Pixabay

While malnutrition can occur at any age, elderly people, aged 65 and above, who are particularly prone to it can safeguard themselves with marriage, according to a study.

The findings showed that people who are unmarried, separated or divorced are most often affected, whilst men and women who are either married or widowed tend to take better care of themselves.

The consequences of malnutrition are manifold. They range from weight loss to a weakened immune system or functional impairment of muscles and all organs. The body falls back on all its reserves.

“The older the people are, the more likely it is that they will suffer from malnutrition. The risk increases a little with every year that passes,” said Dorothee Volkert, from Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) in Germany.

“Malnutrition in the elderly appears to be caused by a surprisingly narrow range of factors. Only age, marital status, difficulties with walking and coping with stairs and stays in hospital had a significant role to play,” Volkert added.

Marriage
Married couple. Pixabay

In the study, appearing in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, the team set out to explore which of a total of 23 variables — ranging from aspects such as difficulties with chewing and swallowing or cognitive impairments to loneliness and depression or moving into a care home — were decisive for malnutrition.

The researchers took six existing sets of data which included 4,844 participants, aged between 72 and 85, from Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

Also Read- Exercising Too Little Puts Your Health At Risk: WHO

According Volkert, a lack of appetite, which is often perceived as a key cause of malnutrition, was of no relevance.

She recommended carrying out further studies to obtain a common definition of malnutrition. (IANS)