Wednesday March 20, 2019

Get Success with These 3-in-1 Hypertension Pills: Study

The findings could impact guidelines on treating hypertension globally.

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'3-in-1' hypertension pill offers better success: Study
'3-in-1' hypertension pill offers better success: Study. Flickr

With over a billion people struggling to control their high blood pressure globally, an Australian study suggests a “three-in-one” pill for better results for hypertension.

The trial involved three drugs, each at half dose, in a single pill for early treatment. It met with success in 70 per cent of the cases in a targeted group, the George Institute for Global Health (GIGH) said on Wednesday.

In conventional medication, patients are treated with one drug at a very low dose, which is increased over time with additional drugs added and increased in dosage to try to reach targets.

Hypertension, 3in 1 pill Flickr
With over a billion people struggling to control their high blood pressure,try a three-in-one” pill for better results. Flickr

However, the Australian-led trials showed that low-dose of the “three-in-one” pill helped almost three-fourth patients to lower their blood pressure compared to just around half receiving normal care, Xinhua news agency reported.

“Our results could help millions reduce their risk of heart attack or stroke,” said Ruth Webster of GIGH said. The study was published in JAMA, a journal of the American Medical Association.

Also Read: Multi-Vitamin Pills May Lower Cataract Risk

The findings could impact guidelines on treating hypertension globally, said the institute. (IANS)

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Health Alert! Be Cautious While Taking Pills With Inactive Ingredients, Can Lead To Adverse Reactions

"While we call these ingredients 'inactive', in many cases they are not. While the doses may be low, we don't know what the threshold is for individuals to react in the majority of instances," the researchers noted. 

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For certain drugs, such as progesterone, there are few alternatives that do not contain this inactive ingredient. VOA

Be cautious while taking medicines as a new study suggests that some ingredients added to pills to improve their shelf life may cause allergy or lead to adverse reactions.

The study found that more than 90 per cent of all oral medications tested contained at least one ingredient including lactose, peanut oil, gluten and chemical dyes that can cause gastrointestinal issues and difficulty in breathing in sensitive individuals.

These components are added to improve the taste, shelf life, absorption and other characteristics of a pill, said researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US.

Pills
“While we call these ingredients ‘inactive’, in many cases they are not. While the doses may be low, we don’t know what the threshold is for individuals to react in the majority of instances,” the researchers noted. 
VOA

“There are hundreds of different versions of pills or capsules that deliver the same medication using a different combination of inactive ingredients,” said Daniel Reker from the varsity.

For the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team analysed data on inactive ingredients in over 42,000 oral medications that contained more than 350,000 inactive ingredients.

The findings showed a total of 38 inactive ingredients that cause allergic symptoms after oral exposure. Approximately 45 per cent of medications contained lactose, nearly 33 per cent contained a food dye, and 0.08 per cent contained peanut oil.

Pills
“There are hundreds of different versions of pills or capsules that deliver the same medication using a different combination of inactive ingredients,” VOA

For certain drugs, such as progesterone, there are few alternatives that do not contain this inactive ingredient.

Also Read: Know When Older Adults Feel Younger Than Their Age

“While we call these ingredients ‘inactive’, in many cases they are not. While the doses may be low, we don’t know what the threshold is for individuals to react in the majority of instances,” the researchers noted.

Precision care and the role for regulation and legislation are essential when it comes to labelling medications that contain an ingredient that may cause an adverse reaction, the team suggested. (IANS)