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People Reviewing Ghazipur Garbage Dump on Google

A constant source of air pollution and accidents, nearly one per cent of the “over-saturated” Ghazipur landfill collapsed in September 2017, claiming two lives

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Garbage dump (representational Image), Wikimedia

Many people rely on Google for viewing eateries or film reviews. But do you know the people have also been reviewing the Ghazipur “mountain of garbage” in east Delhi?

On Google, there are, in fact, now over 100 reviews of the garbage dump. And the “highly recommended” place, which is now threatening to surpass the height of the Qutub Minar, is drawing some of the sharpest sarcasm-filled reviews.

If one reviewer called it the “must go place with your friends, family and business partners,” another termed it the “best location for a family outing”.

“Do try the Punjabi salad at the food court here,” wrote another, in an attempt to highlight, ironically, the unhygienic place that gives off a particularly powerful stench.

Most waste generated in east, central and Old Delhi find its way to the Ghazipur landfill. There are two other landfills in Delhi — one at Okhla (in the south) and the other at Bhalswa (in the north).

A pile of garbage lies on the riverbank along the Ganges riverfront known as “Har ki Pauri,” the most sacred spot in the Hindu holy town of Haridwar where devotees throng. (A. Pasricha/VOA)

A constant source of air pollution and accidents, nearly one per cent of the “over-saturated” Ghazipur landfill collapsed in September 2017, claiming two lives.

Even as the waste management rules call for effective recycling and have set a 20-metre cap on landfill sites, Delhi’s huge un-engineered dumping grounds have grown by several metres over the years, leading people to resort to sarcasm in an attempt to attract the authorities’ attention to the site.

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“This mountain is a treat to watch. Why we drive to hilly places to see hills? We have our own mountain here, made by us in collaboration with the government. Trekking with the help of plastic is a must do activity (sic),” wrote an user who gave four stars to the “mountain of garbage”.

“Great place for foreign tourists who want to see the ‘real India’,” said another who also gave the landfill four stars. The overall current rating of the garbage dump on Google is 3.4. (IANS)

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Google Maps Captures Over 10 mn Miles of Street View Imagery

The company collects street imagery via a fleet of Street View cars, each equipped with nine cameras that capture high-definition imagery from every vantage point possible

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Google Maps
There's also the Street View trekker on Google Maps, a backpack that collects imagery from places where driving isn't possible.

Google Maps have captured more than 10 million miles of Street View imagery – a distance that could circle the globe over 400 times.

The company announced on Friday that Google Earth now lets people browse more than 36 million square miles of high definition satellite images from various providers – covering more than 98 per cent of the entire population – to see the world from above.

“While these stunning photos show us parts of the world we may never get a chance to visit, they also help Google Maps accurately model a world that is changing each day,” said Thomas Escobar, Senior Product Manager, Google Maps.

The idea of Street View started as a side project more than 12 years ago as part of a goal to map the entire world.

The company collects street imagery via a fleet of Street View cars, each equipped with nine cameras that capture high-definition imagery from every vantage point possible.

“These cameras are athermal, meaning that theya�re designed to handle extreme temperatures without changing focus so they can function in a range of environments,” Escobar added.

Each Street View car includes its own photo processing center and lidar sensors that use laser beams to accurately measure distance.

There’s also the Street View trekker, a backpack that collects imagery from places where driving isn’t possible.

These trekkers are carried by boats, sheep, camels, and even scout troops to gather high quality photos from multiple angles, often in some of the hardest-to-map places around the world.

Google Maps
Google Maps have captured more than 10 million miles of Street View imagery – a distance that could circle the globe over 400 times. Pixabay

In 2019 alone, Street View images from the Google Maps community have helped the company assign addresses to nearly seven million buildings in previously under-mapped places like Armenia, Bermuda, Lebanon, Myanmar, Tonga, Zanzibar and Zimbabwe.

Once Google collects photos, it uses a technique called photogrammetry to align and stitch together a single set of images.

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“These images show us critically important details about an area-things like roads, lane markings, buildings and rivers, along with the precise distance between each of these objects. All of this information is gathered without ever needing to set foot in the location itself,” said Google. (IANS)