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Girl students ask for intervention from DCW over gender bias

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A supporter of defeated Iranian presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi shouts slogans during riots in Tehran on June 13, 2009. Hardline incumbent Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was declared winner by a landslide in Iran's hotly-disputed presidential vote, triggering riots by opposition supporters and furious complaints of cheating from his defeated rivals. AFP PHOTO/OLIVIER LABAN-MATTEI (Photo credit should read OLIVIER LABAN-MATTEI/AFP/Getty Images)

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

Around 250 girl students from three universities have written to the Delhi Commission for Women (DCW), asking intervention on alleged gender bias in their hostels. In an online petition directed to DCW chairperson Swati Maliwal, girls demanded equal rights.

The issue raised by the students was that of restriction from stepping out of the hostel after 8 pm. A similar deadline was set by Jamia Milia Islamia University in its hostels. On that, the commission sent out a notice to Jamia’s Vice Chancellor asking explanation on why such a ban has been imposed on the girls?

These students belong to Jawaharlal Nehru University, Ambedkar University, and Delhi University. They are objecting the issue of ‘moral policing’ by Universities.

The petition stated that such ‘sexist’ practices and regulations are highly discriminatory. Not only Jamia, various other educational institutes in Delhi are encouraging these actions toward safeguarding women, but are rather derogatory to their freedom. Terming these restrictions as ‘pro-women’, colleges are hiding from installing adequate safety measures. It quoted, “We really do feel that safe city cannot be built by caging hundreds of young women in hostels or just by fixing CCTV cameras.”

Students demanded DCW to conduct an inspection of hostels around Delhi and held meetings in deciding a way through the issue. DCW claimed that they are yet to receive the letter.

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Petting Dogs, Cats Can Improve Students’ Mood: Study

These results were found even while considering that some students may have had very high or low levels to begin with

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The results showed that the pups' attractiveness was lowest at birth and increased to a maximum before 10 weeks of age before declining and then levelling off.
Representational Image. pixabay

College is stressful. Students have classes, exams and so many other pressures common in modern life and now researchers have found that petting dogs and cats can improve students’ mood with stress-relieving physiological benefits, a study shows.

According to the study published in the journal AERA Open, many universities have instituted “Pet Your Stress Away” programmes, where students can come in and interact with cats and dogs.

“Just 10 minutes can have a significant impact,” students in our study that interacted with cats and dogs had a significant reduction in cortisol, a major stress hormone,” said Patricia Pendry, Associate Professor at Washington State University.

The study involved 249 college students randomly divided into four groups. The first group received hands-on interaction in small groups with cats and dogs for 10 minutes. They could pet, play with and generally hang out with the animals as they wanted.

To compare effects of different exposures to animals, the second group observed other people petting animals while they waited in line for their turn. The third group watched a slideshow of the same animals available during the intervention, while the fourth group was “waitlisted”.

“Relations with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment. They also provide older people with a sense of being needed and loved,” said Mary Janevic, researcher at the University of Michigan in the US.  Pixabay

According to the researchers, those students waited for their turn quietly for 10 minutes without their phones, reading materials or other stimuli, but were told they would experience animal interaction soon.

For the findings, several salivary cortisol samples were collected from each participant, starting in the morning when they woke up.

Once all the data was crunched from the various samples, the students who interacted directly with the pets showed significantly less cortisol in their saliva after the interaction.

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These results were found even while considering that some students may have had very high or low levels to begin with.

“What we wanted to learn was whether this exposure would help students reduce their stress in a less subjective way. And it did, which is exciting because the reduction of stress hormones may, over time, have significant benefits for physical and mental health,” Pendry said. (IANS)