Tuesday February 25, 2020

Girls Who Sleep Late At Night Are More Likely To Gain Weight

Teenage girls who prefer to go to bed late are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, warn researchers

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Teenage, Girls, Night owl, Weight gain
Those who stayed up far later on weekends than weeknights were considered to have high social jet lag. Wikimedia Commons

Teenage girls who prefer to go to bed late are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, warn researchers.

For the study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, a total of 804 adolescents — 418 girls and 386 boys aged between 11 to 16 — were analysed.

The children responded to questionnaires on their sleep habits and wore an actigraph – a wrist device that tracks movement, said researchers from the Kaiser Permanente, a healthcare company in the US.

During the study, the research team measured the participants’ waist size and calculated their proportion of body fat using a technique called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.

They also estimated the children’s social jet lag — the difference between their weeknight and weekend bed-times. Those who stayed up far later on weekends than weeknights were considered to have high social jet lag.

Teenage, Girls, Night owl, Weight gain
Each hour of social jet lag was associated with a 1.19 cm larger waste size and a 0.45 kg/m2 increase in body fat. RFA

According to the study, for girls, staying up late was associated with an average 0.58 cm increase in waist size and a 0.16 kg/m2 increase in body fat.

Each hour of social jet lag was associated with a 1.19 cm larger waste size and a 0.45 kg/m2 increase in body fat.

These associations were reduced, but still remained, after the researchers statistically adjusted for other factors known to influence weight, such as sleep duration, diet, physical activity and television viewing.

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Although the researchers found slight associations between these measures and waist size and body fat in boys, they were not statistically significant.

The researchers concluded that improving sleep schedules may be helpful in preventing obesity in childhood and adolescence, especially in girls. (IANS)

Next Story

Know Why Parents Should Worry About Their Daughters’ Perfect Selfies

Why parents should worry about girls' perfect selfies

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selfies
Adolescent girls who invest a lot of time in editing and selecting the selfies to post are mostly body insecure. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Researchers have recently found that adolescent girls who invest a lot of time in editing and selecting the perfect selfie may feel more body shame and appearance anxiety.

Published in the Journal of Children and Media, the research showed that when adolescent girls spend too much time agonising over which photo of themselves to post, or rely heavily on editing apps to alter their images, there may be a cause for concern.

The study found that selfie editing and time invested in creating and selecting the perfect one, were both related to self-objectification, which led to body shame, appearance anxiety and more negative appearance evaluations in teen girls.

“Our main finding was that we really shouldn’t be too worried about kids who take selfies and share them; that’s not where the negative effects come from. It’s the investment and the editing that yielded negative effects,” said senior study author Jennifer Stevens Aubrey from University of Arizona in the US.

“Selfie editing and selfie investment predicted self-objectification, and girls who self-objectify were more likely to feel shameful about their bodies or anxious about their appearance,” Aubrey added. The findings were based on a study of 278 teenage girls, ages 14 to 17.

selfies
“Our main finding was that we really shouldn’t be too worried about kids who take selfies and share them; that’s not where the negative effects come from,” said the researchers. Pixabay

They also responded to a series of statements designed to measure how much time and effort they spend selecting which selfies to share on social media – what researchers referred to in the paper as their level of “selfie investment.”

In addition, the girls completed a series of questionnaires designed to measure their levels of self-objectification and appearance concerns. The researchers said they chose to focus on adolescent girls because they are especially vulnerable to self-objectification.

Girls also are more likely than boys to experience negative consequences, such as body image issues, as the result of self-objectification, which can in turn lead to problems like depression and eating disorders, the researchers said. “Self-objectification is the pathway to so many things in adolescence that we want to prevent,” Aubrey said.

Also Read- Early Exposure of Infants To Household Cleaning Products Can Make Them Prone To Asthma

The researchers said parents and caregivers of adolescent girls should be aware of red flags on teens’ phones, such as selfie editing apps or camera rolls teeming with selfies. If a teen seems to be selfie-obsessed, it might be time for a talk, they added. (IANS)