Saturday October 19, 2019

Girls Who Sleep Late At Night Are More Likely To Gain Weight

Teenage girls who prefer to go to bed late are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, warn researchers

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Teenage, Girls, Night owl, Weight gain
Those who stayed up far later on weekends than weeknights were considered to have high social jet lag. Wikimedia Commons

Teenage girls who prefer to go to bed late are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, warn researchers.

For the study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, a total of 804 adolescents — 418 girls and 386 boys aged between 11 to 16 — were analysed.

The children responded to questionnaires on their sleep habits and wore an actigraph – a wrist device that tracks movement, said researchers from the Kaiser Permanente, a healthcare company in the US.

During the study, the research team measured the participants’ waist size and calculated their proportion of body fat using a technique called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.

They also estimated the children’s social jet lag — the difference between their weeknight and weekend bed-times. Those who stayed up far later on weekends than weeknights were considered to have high social jet lag.

Teenage, Girls, Night owl, Weight gain
Each hour of social jet lag was associated with a 1.19 cm larger waste size and a 0.45 kg/m2 increase in body fat. RFA

According to the study, for girls, staying up late was associated with an average 0.58 cm increase in waist size and a 0.16 kg/m2 increase in body fat.

Each hour of social jet lag was associated with a 1.19 cm larger waste size and a 0.45 kg/m2 increase in body fat.

These associations were reduced, but still remained, after the researchers statistically adjusted for other factors known to influence weight, such as sleep duration, diet, physical activity and television viewing.

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Although the researchers found slight associations between these measures and waist size and body fat in boys, they were not statistically significant.

The researchers concluded that improving sleep schedules may be helpful in preventing obesity in childhood and adolescence, especially in girls. (IANS)

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Weight Gain in Mid-20s is Linked to Early Death, Study Says

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk

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Weight loss at older ages , Apart from Weight gain (from middle to late adulthood) is also linked to higher risk. Pixabay

Weight Gain from your mid-20s into middle age is associated with an increased risk of premature death, warn researchers.

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk.

“The results highlight the importance of maintaining normal weight across adulthood, especially preventing weight gain in early adulthood, for preventing premature deaths in later life,” said study researchers from China.

For the study, researchers based in China set out to investigate the association between weight changes across adulthood and mortality.

Their findings were based on data from the 1988-94 and 1999-2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative annual survey that includes interviews, physical examinations and blood samples, to gauge the health of the US citizens.

Their analysis included 36,051 people aged 40 years or over with measured body weight and height at the start of the survey (baseline) and recalled weight at young adulthood (25 years old) and middle adulthood (average age 47 years).

Deaths from any cause and specifically from heart diseases were recorded for an average of 12 years, during which time there were 10,500 deaths.

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Weight Gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight. Pixabay

After taking account of potentially influential factors, the researchers found that people who remained obese throughout adult life had the highest risk of mortality, while people who remained overweight throughout adult life had a very modest or no association with mortality.

Weight gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight.

Weight loss over this period was not significantly related to mortality.

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But as people got older, the association between weight gain and mortality weakened, whereas the association with weight loss from middle to late adulthood became stronger and significant. (IANS)