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Global warming threat: Kochi could sink within 100 years

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

“A large part of the coastal areas in Kochi could sink within 100 years,” said the scientists of the National Institute of Oceanography.

A recent study by the institution showed that the rise of water level due to global warming could submerge a large part of the coastal areas in Kochi within 100 years.

The research was conducted by scientists R. Mani Murali and P.K. Dinesh Kumar of National Institute of Oceanography.

The scientists also claimed that the rapid growth of the coastal city could create a huge problem regarding coastal environment and would severely impact fishing.

The study showed that the water level is on a rise at 1-2 meters against the globally accepted rise of sea level of 0.5 meters over the coming century.

‘For the sea level rise scenarios of 1m and 2m, the total inundation zones were estimated to be 169.11 km per square and 598.83 km per square respectively using Geographic Information System (GIS). The losses of urban areas were estimated at 43 km per square and 187 km per square for the 1m and 2m sea level rise respectively, which is alarming information for the most densely populated state of India,’ said the research paper published earlier this year.

‘The results obtained conclusively point that sea level rise scenarios will bring profound effects on the land use and land cover classes as well as on coastal landforms in the study region. Coastal inundation would leave ocean front and inland properties vulnerable,’ the study further said.

According to the report the city ranks top in environmental violation issues and if this trend continues it will be submerged in coming years..

‘With the projected inundation of this magnitude, the coastal zone would be at risk of flooding, where several near shore settlements will be impacted severely. Damages to this coastal city cannot be observed in isolation as it is linked with other regions through economic and cultural ties. Changes will affect the hinterlands too, and chain reactions may follow. Urban planning will be confronted with a number of anticipatory issues, including adaptation strategies,’ the report warned.

The report adviced the government to amend its policies and to set up alternative agricultural practice in this area to save Kochi from this fatal disaster.

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India To Become Global Steel Manufacturing Hub By 2031

The Modi government seems determined to boost the country's crude steel production capacity to 300 MT by 2030-31 in a bid to make India a global steel manufacturing hub

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steel, manufacturing, india, global
Modi government seems determined to boost the country's crude steel production capacity. Wikimedia Commons

The Modi government seems determined to boost the country’s crude steel production capacity to 300 MT by 2030-31 in a bid to make India a global steel manufacturing hub.

At present, China is the world’s largest steel producer with a production capacity of 928.3 MT of crude steel (2018), while India, with 106.5 MT of crude steel production, ranks second on the list. Dedicated participation of all stakeholders is a must to achieve the projected capacity target of 300 MT by 2030-31.

To deliberate on major issues plaguing the sector, the Ministry of Steel is organising in Delhi on Monday a day-long conclave, during which Steel Minister Dharmendra Pradhan will seek suggestions from the stakeholders to address its challenges, identify opportunities and arrive at tangible interventions that can aid the growth of the Indian steel industry.

The National Steel Policy 2017 envisages ‘creating a self-sufficient steel industry that is technologically advanced, globally competitive and promotes inclusive growth’.

Being the third largest steel consumer in the world after China and USA, India’s per capita steel consumption at 74 kgs is one-third the global average of 225 kgs.

steel, manufacturing, india, global
Being the third largest steel consumer in the world after China and USA, India’s per capita steel consumption at 74 kgs is one-third the global average of 225 kgs. Wikimedia Commons

Various countries have focused on rapidly increasing their steel consumption in the high growth phase of their economy. At present, India’s majority steel demand comes from construction, infrastructure, automobiles and capital goods, among others.

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Steel intensive construction offers an increased pace of durable and environmentally sustainable construction. Its recyclable nature also contributes to the circular economy.

The government has set a target to make India a $5 trillion economy by 2024-25, therefore promoting domestic steel industry is essential, given its high GDP multiplier and critical role in the construction and infrastructure sectors, said the Ministry. (IANS)