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Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing

Following are the key reasons behind this tip:

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Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing
Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing. (Wikimedia commons)

Most women can’t imagine stepping out of the house without makeup, but avoiding it one day a week, can help in delaying the ageing process, suggests a skincare expert.

Rita Strazinska, founder of Bio2You Organic Seabuckthorn skincare, has urged women to go makeup free one day a week, for a minimum of 24 hours, to help protect the skin and allow it to rejuvenate without being weighed down by cosmetics, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

“By opting to give skin a breather once a week, accompanied by a good skincare routine, women may find their self-confidence levels actually increase as they notice the condition of their skin improving, whilst the world has chance to appreciate their natural beauty,” said Strazinska.

Makeup can speed up the process of ageing.
Makeup can speed up the process of ageing. Pixabay

Following are the key reasons behind her tip:

A clearer complexion: No makeup can help in reduction of spots, blemishes and acne. Makeup can also irritate the skin, leading to redness and allergic reactions.

Go chemical free: Most cosmetics have harmful chemicals like parabens, so it is wise to give skin a rest from such ingredients at times.

Also Read: How the brain copes with ageing

More time: The average woman spends around 20 minutes every morning putting on makeup. Going makeup free means more time to sleep or eat breakfast! (Bollywood Country)

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Alzheimer’s Drugs Improve Memory and Slow The Ageing Process

Old age is the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and above the age of 65, a person's risk of developing the disease doubles about every five years

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Alzheimer's
The contribution of old age-associated detrimental processes to the disease has been largely neglected in Alzheimer's disease Drug discovery. Pixabay

Researchers have found that two experimental Alzheimer’s Drugs, known as CMS121 and J147, improve memory and slow the degeneration of brain cells.

The research, published in the journal eLife, suggests that the drugs may be useful for treating a broader array of conditions and points out a new pathway that links normal ageing to Alzheimer’s disease.

“This study further validated these two compounds not only as Alzheimer’s drug candidates, but also as potentially more widely useful for their anti-aging effects,” said the study’s co-author Pamela Maher, a senior staff scientist at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the US.

The researchers have shown how these compounds can slow ageing in healthy older mice, blocking the damage to brain cells that normally occurs during ageing and restoring the levels of specific molecules to those seen in younger brains.

Old age is the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and above the age of 65, a person’s risk of developing the disease doubles about every five years.

“The contribution of old age-associated detrimental processes to the disease has been largely neglected in Alzheimer’s disease drug discovery,” said Antonio Currais, a Salk staff scientist and first author of the new paper.

In the new study, the researchers turned to a strain of mice that age unusually fast.

A subset of these mice was given CMS121 or J147 beginning at nine months old — the equivalent to late middle age in humans.

Alzheimer's
Researchers have found that two experimental Alzheimer’s Drugs, known as CMS121 and J147, improve memory and slow the degeneration of brain cells. Pixabay

After four months, the team tested the memory and behaviour of the animals and analysed the genetic and molecular markers in their brains.

Not only did the animals given either of the drug candidates performed better on memory tests than mice that had not received any treatment, but their brains also showed differences at the cellular and molecular levels.

In particular, expression of genes associated with the cell’s energy-generating structures called mitochondria was preserved by CMS121 and J147 with ageing.

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“The bottom line was that these two compounds prevent molecular changes that are associated with ageing,” said Maher.

More detailed experiments showed that both drugs affected mitochondria by increasing levels of the chemical acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA). (IANS)