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Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing

Following are the key reasons behind this tip:

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Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing
Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing. (Wikimedia commons)

Most women can’t imagine stepping out of the house without makeup, but avoiding it one day a week, can help in delaying the ageing process, suggests a skincare expert.

Rita Strazinska, founder of Bio2You Organic Seabuckthorn skincare, has urged women to go makeup free one day a week, for a minimum of 24 hours, to help protect the skin and allow it to rejuvenate without being weighed down by cosmetics, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

“By opting to give skin a breather once a week, accompanied by a good skincare routine, women may find their self-confidence levels actually increase as they notice the condition of their skin improving, whilst the world has chance to appreciate their natural beauty,” said Strazinska.

Makeup can speed up the process of ageing.
Makeup can speed up the process of ageing. Pixabay

Following are the key reasons behind her tip:

A clearer complexion: No makeup can help in reduction of spots, blemishes and acne. Makeup can also irritate the skin, leading to redness and allergic reactions.

Go chemical free: Most cosmetics have harmful chemicals like parabens, so it is wise to give skin a rest from such ingredients at times.

Also Read: How the brain copes with ageing

More time: The average woman spends around 20 minutes every morning putting on makeup. Going makeup free means more time to sleep or eat breakfast! (Bollywood Country)

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Researchers Discover Novel Drug to Delay Ageing

Besides, the blood chemistry of the mice that underwent drug treatment was also found to have no adverse effects as it was similar to the untreated mice

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Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing
Go Makeup Free Once a Week to Delay Ageing. (Wikimedia commons)

Researchers, including one of Indian origin, have developed a new drug that can delay ageing demonstrated by declining muscle mass, strength and function.

As human bodies age, they increasingly lose the ability to repair and rebuild degenerating skeletal muscles. This can dramatically limit the ability of older adults to live fully active and independent lives.

In the study, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston identified a protein called Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) in muscle stem cells that appears to be responsible for the age-related dysfunction.

They developed a small molecule drug, NNMT inhibitor (NNMTi), which when prescribed to aged mice could limit NNMT’s effects as well as significantly increase muscle size, strength and metabolic state in the animals.

By resetting muscle stem cells to a more youthful state, the mice could be rejuvenated so that they could more effectively repair muscle tissues, the researchers explained.

“There are no treatments currently available to delay, arrest or reverse age-related muscle degeneration,” said Harshini Neelakantan, research scientist at UTMB.

Makeup can speed up the process of ageing.
Slow down skin ageing by this drug. Pixabay

“These initial results support the development of an innovative drug treatment that has the potential to help the elderly to become fitter, faster and stronger, thus enabling them to live more active and independent lives as they age,” she added.

For the study, published in Biochemical Pharmacology, the team treated ageing mice, suffering from muscle injury, with the drug or a placebo.

Following seven days of treatment, researchers saw that the aged mice, which received the drug, had more functional muscle stem cells than the placebo mice.

Also Read- Social Media Giant Facebook Accused of Revealing Sensitive Health Data

Moreover, the size of the muscle fibres doubled and the strength also increased significantly.

Besides, the blood chemistry of the mice that underwent drug treatment was also found to have no adverse effects as it was similar to the untreated mice. (IANS)