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Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

The influential Roman Catholic Church in Goa, will on June 30 launch a cancer support network which will focus on prevention and support mechanisms.

“‘CanSurvive’ has two dimensions that one can survive from getting cancer and also can survive after getting it. The campaign wishes to build a strong network with oncologists, surgeons, NGOs and civil society groups to provide information and support,” a statement issued by Caritas-Goa, a Catholic relief and development agency, said on Thursday.


The CanSurvive campaign, which will function under the aegis of Caritas-Goa, will be launched by Archbishop-Patriarch for the Goa and Daman region Filipe Neri Ferrao in the presence of Caritas-India Director Fr. Paul Moonjely at the St Joseph Vaz Spiritual Renewal Centre in Old Goa on June 30.


Cancer survivor (Representational image). Flickr

According to Caritas-Goa, about eight persons are detected with cancer every day in the coastal state and a lot of patients and their kin fall prey to misinformation about treatment options.

‘CanSurvive’ is aimed at intervening and suggesting appropriate options so that citizens do not fall prey to quacks,” the statement said, adding that the campaign would also create awareness about cancer, cancer prevention lifestyles and cancer management in schools and local communities, along with providing counselling, support, palliative care information and resource mobilisation for needy cancer patients.

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“A huge emphasis will be laid on sensitising people with special focus on children and youth on leading a healthy lifestyle,” the statement said.

In 2019, former Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar died after suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer. Former Deputy Chief Minister Francis D’Souza had also died of cancer. (IANS)


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