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It began as a nuptial ceremony and has turned into one of the most vibrant celebrations of harvest crop in the whole world.

Come October and Munich goes wild with the celebrations of Oktoberfest, primarily known all over the world for the large quantities of beer that quite literally 'flow through the city'. It began as a nuptial ceremony and has turned into one of the most vibrant celebrations of harvest crop in the whole world.

When German Crown Prince Ludwig got married to Princess Therese, he decided to call for a city-wide celebration. A public march was conducted and the prince marched with his new bride. For days, the people of Munich thronged the streets, and drank to the health of the royal union. Gallons of German beer were poured out while the people made merry. Today, the tradition of this celebration has been carried over, except there is no bride or groom to toast. Horse races are conducted instead, where people still take to the streets to dance and drink.


People gathered for the beer during Oktoberfest When they gathered their crops in October, the beer was ready to be consumed, and they celebrated their crop. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons


The celebration morphed and overlapped with the harvest festival by the end of the 19th century. People brewed their beer in March, and allowed it to ferment for six months. When they gathered their crops in October, the beer was ready to be consumed, and they celebrated their crop. Some of the farmers keep up this tradition even today, despite the mechanized breweries that produce much of Germany's beer.

Public march during Oktoberfest Oktoberfest 1959 Image credit: wikimedia commons


Generations changed, traditions changes, and of course, the royalty changed, but Munich's streets come alive every October to the sweet taste of beer. Quality improvements have been made over time, and the once golden colour has grown to a darker copper colour. Not just Munich, but Germans all over the world organize great drinking events roughly around the first week of October. In Germany, the beer standards are very high, and only the finest quality makes it to the table, while across the world, it doesn't matter as much as the spirit of the celebration.

Bands performing during the festival In 2010, this event celebrated 200 years since it was first announced. Nearly a million gallons of beer have been drunk each year during Oktoberfest, according to records available. Image credit: wikimedia commons


In 2010, this event celebrated 200 years since it was first announced. Nearly a million gallons of beer have been drunk each year during Oktoberfest, according to records available. Since the pandemic, the consumption has drastically reduced, and people have been unable to gather, but the celebration lives on in their hearts and households.

Keywords: Germany, Munich, October, Oktoberfest, Prince Ludwig


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Wikimedia Commons

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Keywords: Pakistan, Islam, Serials, Dramas, Culture, Teachings.