Monday October 22, 2018
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Google expunges ‘view image’ button

Google will make copyright attribution and disclaimers more prominent in image search results

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Google last week signed a multi-year global licensing deal with Getty Images. Pixabay
Google last week signed a multi-year global licensing deal with Getty Images. Pixabay
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  • After partnering with Getty images google no longer has it’s ‘view image’ button.
  • The button was extremely useful for users since when you’re searching for a picture, there’s a very good chance that you want to take it and use it for something
  • The Visit button remains, so users can see images in the context of the web pages they’re on.

San Francisco: In a move to curb the lifting of copyrighted images from its platform, Google has removed the “view image” button from its image search results. “Today we’re launching some changes on Google Images to help connect users and useful websites.

“This will include removing the View Image button. The Visit button remains, so users can see images in the context of the web pages they’re on,” Google Search Liaison tweeted on Friday. The change is seen as part of Google’s partnering with stock photo provider Getty Images.

Also read: Google may sell audio books on play store

Google last week signed a multi-year global licensing deal with Getty Images, allowing it to use Getty’s content within its various products and services. According to a report in The Verge, Google will make copyright attribution and disclaimers more prominent in image search results.

Google has collaborated with getty images. Wikimedia Commons
Google has collaborated with Getty Images. Wikimedia Commons

Now, users have to wait for a website to load and then scroll through it to find the image. “The change is essentially meant to frustrate users. Google has long been under fire from photographers and publishers who felt that image search allowed people to steal their pictures, and the removal of the view image button is one of many changes being made in response,” the report said.

Also Read: Indian-born Google CEO Sundar Pichai unveils ‘Google Assistant’

Websites sometimes disable the ability to right-click, too, which would make it even harder for someone to grab a photo they’re looking for. “Fortunately, there’s still at least one way around it: if you right click, you can select “open image in new tab” or “view image” (or whatever your browser’s equivalent option is), and you’ll still open up the full-size picture,” the report added.

In addition to removing the ‘view image’ button, Google has also removed the ‘search by image’ button that appeared when people opened up an image.

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Tech Giant Google To Charge $40 Per Device From Android Makers

While Android will remain free and open source, Google will offer separate licenses to the Google Search app and to Chrome

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Google to charge $40 per device to Android makers. Wikimedia Commons

Android manufacturers will have to pay $40 per device to Google in Europe to be featured into Google Play Store and other mobile apps.

According to a report in The Verge on Friday, a confidential fee schedule shows costs as high as $40 per device to install the “Google Mobile Services” suite of apps.

“The new fees vary depending on country and device type, and it would apply to devices activated on or after February 1st, 2019,” the report said.

“Google is also offering separate agreements to cover some or all of the licensing costs for companies that choose to install Chrome and Google search on their devices as well, according to a person familiar with the terms,” it added.

The tech giant however, has declined to comment.

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A Google logo is seen at the company’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, VOA

Earlier this week, Google said it was updating the compatibility agreements with mobile device makers and may ask them to pay a fee for Google Play and other its other Android apps used in Europe.

The move was to comply with the decision of the European Union’s anti-trust watchdog’s decision against Android.

The European Commission ruled that forcing device manufacturers to pre-install Google Search and Chrome was against its competition rules and fined the tech giant a whopping $5.1 billion in July (Google has appealed against the ruling).

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With the new changes to Android that will come into effect on October 29, smartphone makers in Europe will need to pay for certain Google apps.

While Android will remain free and open source, Google will offer separate licenses to the Google Search app and to Chrome. (IANS)

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