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Google, Facebook contribute to Kejriwal’s free Wi-Fi dream

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

arvindkejriwalNew Delhi: Top global names in the internet and telecom sectors like Google and Facebook have been in discussions with the Arvind Kejriwal government, which aims at making Delhi a free wi-fi city, putting it at par with San Francisco, Stockholm and Shanghai in providing free internet connectivity throughout the city.

As the project of making Delhi a free public wi-fi city gains momentum, government officials are expecting some of the world’s best known tech firms to come forth to help in implementing the project throughout the city, over the next two months.

A Delhi government official told the Economic Times (ET), “Google, Facebook, Cisco, which is a global leader, Aruba, Ericsson, Vodafone, all of these companies, including many domestic firms, have all consulted with us and shown interest.” The official also said that the RFP tender document has been drafted and is waiting for final approval from the administration.

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“Half of the discussion has been finished, the remaining half will be done on Sunday afternoon. CM said though it is a holiday, he will have a meeting. He changed massive portions of the RFP and redid the proposal,” the official said.

Regarding the same project, Google gave a statement to ET, “We were approached for suggestions in very early stage discussion of this project.” Facebook said, “We are committed to working with various government agencies to help make Digital India a reality.”

Dwarka MLA Adarsh Shastri, the AAP government’s IT face, who oversaw the planning and consultation process of this project confirmed the interest shown by the companies.

Shastri told ET: “The interest level is very high (among global firms) because of the huge opportunity that they feel and the fact that this is a huge database. From a social standpoint they all want to participate in bridging the digital divide. Also, Delhi being a capital city, if you do something here, you are able to showcase something not just in India but also rest of the world.”

There are two crore devices in Delhi and capacity for simultaneous log-in for 50 lakh devices will be in place over a period of time. If cleared by the cabinet in mid-September, the tender document will be circulated soon and the officials expect tenders to be awarded in October.

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Uruguayan Teenager Finds Security Flaw, Rewarded By Google

Google just awarded the Uruguayan teenager $36,337 for finding a vulnerability that would have allowed him to make changes to internal company systems, CNBC reported on Saturday

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Although, Pereira found the bug earlier this year, he only just got permission to write about how he discovered it this week. Pixabay

Google has rewarded a Uruguayan teenager a “bug bounty” of more than $36,000 for disclosing a severe security flaw.

Ezequiel Pereira’s sporadic poking around has finally paid off in a big way: Google just awarded the Uruguayan teenager $36,337 for finding a vulnerability that would have allowed him to make changes to internal company systems, CNBC reported on Saturday.

“I found something almost immediately that was worth $500 and it just felt so amazing. So I decided to just keep trying ever since then,” Pereira was quoted as saying by CNBC.

google
Ezequiel Pereira’s sporadic poking around has finally paid off in a big way. Pixabay

“It feels really good – I’m glad that I found something that was so important,” he added.

Although, Pereira found the bug earlier this year, he only just got permission to write about how he discovered it this week, after Google confirmed that it had fixed the issue, the report said.

It marks Pereira’s fifth accepted bug, but it’s by far his most lucrative.

Pereira was about a month shy of 17 when he first got paid for exposing a Google security flaw through its bug bounty programme.

Read More: Ex-Google Chief: Elon Musk ‘exactly wrong’ on AI  

Pereira got his first computer when he was 10, took an initial programming class when he was 11 and then spent years teaching himself different coding languages and techniques.

In 2016, Google flew him to its California headquarters after he won a coding contest. (IANS)

 

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