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Efforts of Google And Facebook to Tackle Dark Ads on Ireland’s Referendum Not Successful

Yet screenshots sent to TRI from voters in Ireland after that announcement showed ads continuing to appear on Google's platform.

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Tweeters unable to automatically save tweets to facebook. Pixabay
Tweeters unable to automatically save tweets to facebook. Pixabay

Attempts by Facebook and Google to tackle “dark ads” and foreign interference in the run-up to Ireland’s referendum on abortion have not been entirely successful, data from a transparency group seen by CNN has shown.

Ireland’s abortion laws — some of the most restrictive in the developed world — are enshrined in the eighth amendment to the country’s constitution, which places an unborn child’s right to life on equal footing with that of the mother.

On May 25, Ireland will vote to repeal or retain the amendment.

The Transparent Referendum Initiative (TRI), a volunteer organisation set up to monitor social-media posts about the referendum has collected ads from 180 Facebook groups targeting the Irish voters.

Facebook announced it would ban all ads from foreign groups on May 8, and said: “We understand the sensitivity of this campaign and will be working hard to ensure neutrality at all stages.

“We are an open platform for people to express ideas and views on both sides of a debate. Our goal is simple: to help ensure a free, fair and transparent vote on this important issue.”

Attempts by Facebook and Google to tackle "dark ads" and foreign interference in the run-up to Ireland's referendum on abortion have not been entirely successful, data from a transparency group seen by CNN has shown.
Google an Facebook are fighting dark ads relating to Ireland’s Referendum. IANS

But the TRI data shows that out of around 200 new ads related to the vote since that announcement, at least 31 per cent have been administered at least in part by page managers outside Ireland, CNN reported.

Google also announced it would not accept any political ads on any side of the campaign last week. “Following our update around election integrity efforts globally, we have decided to pause all ads related to the Irish referendum on the Eighth Amendment,” a statement read.

Yet screenshots sent to TRI from voters in Ireland after that announcement showed ads continuing to appear on Google’s platform.

One week after Google said it would “pause all ads related to the Irish referendum on the Eighth Amendment”, some ads were still appearing in those searches.

 

Google said they had “taken action” after being showed this ad.

Irish law bans foreign citizens and groups from making donations to campaign groups and prohibits political ads on television or radio broadcasts during campaigns, CNN said.

The ad bans do not extend online or on social, meaning anyone is open to buying an ad on platforms like Facebook or Google. (IANS)

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Google Quietly Removes its AI-Powered Camera Product ‘Google Clips’

Though Google provided a few updates to improve the overall performance of the camera, it failed to impress the potential users

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Google has retired its AI-powered camera product 'Google Clips', because the actual product listing has been removed from the companys online store. Pixabay

The US based search engine giant Google has quietly retired its AI-powered camera product ‘Google Clips’, because the actual product listing has been removed from the companys online store.

Google Clips was launched in 2017 for $249. It features a 12-megapixel sensor, 130-degree field-of-view lens and 8GB of internal memory.

Google
Google decides to discontinue the product because it was not able to create its special place in the market due to its high price. Pixabay

AI-powered Google Clips is a small camera designed to leverage modern technology in order to automatically capture and preserve life’s most memorable moments, 9TO5Google reported.

According to reports, Google is discontinuing the product because it was not able to create its special place in the market due to its high price. Beyond that, many users found that the camera did not function quite as well as they had hoped it would.

ALSO READ: Salesforce CEO Calls Facebook as ‘New Cigarettes’ for Kids

Though, the US based search engine giant provided a few updates to improve the overall performance of the camera, it failed to impress the potential users. (IANS)