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Google Glass to help patients in remote areas

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Source: Google images
Source: Google images
Source: Google images

New York: Google Glass may be used to effectively extend bedside consults to distant healthcare facilities such as community and rural hospitals to diagnose and manage patients, researchers suggest.

“Glass is positioned perfectly as an emergency medicine telemedical device. It is small, hands free and portable, so you can bring it right to the bedside and have a real-time specialist with you when you need one,” said Peter R. Chai from University of Massachusetts medical school.

Traditional telemedicine devices usually consist of large desktop or laptop computers affixed to a big cart that has to be rolled from one exam room to another exam room.

This limits both access and functionality in a busy emergency room setting.

Through the glass, the physicians can stream video of an exam, take and enlarge photos and consult with remote specialists.

In the study, emergency medicine residents at UMass Memorial Medical Centre performed 18 toxicology consults with Google Glass.

Physicians wearing Google Glass evaluated the patients at bedside while a secure video feed was sent to the toxicology supervising consultant. The supervising consultant then guided the resident through text messages displayed on the Glass.

With Google Glass, consulting toxicologists were more confident in diagnosing specific toxidromes.

Additional data collected showed that the use of Google Glass also changed management of patient care in more than half of the cases seen.

Specifically, six of those patients received antidotes they otherwise would not have.

“Placing an expert at the virtual bedside of the patient has huge advantages. It brings a specialist to patients that might not otherwise have access to that kind of expertise,” Chai said.

Because Google Glass is relatively unobtrusive to patients, can be operated hands free and is extremely portable, it has a distinct advantage over traditional telemedicine platforms,” he added.

The study was published in the Journal of Medical Toxicology.

(IANS)

Next Story

Medical Selfies can Improve Relationship between Patient and Doctor: Study

For the study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, researchers first interviewed 30 patients, clinicians and caregivers

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For the study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, researchers first interviewed 30 patients, clinicians and caregivers. Pixabay

Taking medical ‘selfies’ and sharing them with a doctor empowers and reassures patients and can improve their relationship with the medical practitioner, a research has found.

“Healthcare consumers feel this data is valuable, it helps them have a sense of autonomy in their care, improves their view of the service they are being provided and it enhances the relationship between doctor and patient because there is a sense of mutual respect and communication,” said Kara Burns from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia.

To gauge experiences with and attitudes to consumer-generated health photographs, the researchers conducted a two-part study. For the study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, researchers first interviewed 30 patients, clinicians and caregivers.

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Women taking selfie (Representational Image). VOA

In the second part, parents were asked to take photos of their children’s surgical wounds at the hospital and send it to the surgeon so that he could review healing.

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Parents said it improved their confidence in and satisfaction with the medical service and taking the photos was a useful reminder for them to check how the surgical sites were healing. The findings from the photographic trial supported conclusions drawn from the interview study.

“The parents who took part in the trial said they felt reassured and that the service was going above and beyond. They said normally the door feels shut when you leave a hospital and providing the photos was a way to stay connected and contact the surgeon afterwards,” Burns said. (IANS)