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Google May Launch New Set of Controls at Google I/O

Its rival Apple offers "do not disturb" modes that limit an iPhone's function overnight or while driving.

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The updated "Google Pay" is first rolling out in the US, followed by the UK. Pixabay
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To help users manage time spend on Android mobile devices, Google may launch a new set of controls to its operating system at its annual developer conference “Google I/O” scheduled to kick-off on Tuesday.

In his keynote address in US’ Mountain View city in California, Indian-origin Chief Executive Officer of Google, Sundar Pichai, was expected to emphasise the theme of responsibility, The Washington Post reported late on Monday.

This anticipated shift is reportedly due to the increased public scrutiny of the industry that revolves around the so-called negative consequences of technology products that are used by people.

“Some of the criticism centres on the suspected addictive nature of many devices and programmes,” the report said.

However, when it comes to family controls, Google is a step ahead with “Family Link” — a suite of tools allows parents to regulate how much time their children can spend on apps and remotely lock their child’s device.

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Google may launch new OS P at the event, Pixabay

Its rival Apple offers “do not disturb” modes that limit an iPhone’s function overnight or while driving.

Google might also announce new capabilities to its Artificial Intelligence (AI)-powered Google Assistant to make its products more interactive and helpful.

It might also launch the latest version of Android operating system, called Android P. An early iteration of Android P was released to developers and anyone who owns Google’s Pixel phones in early March.

According to the media reports, the next OS might be called “Android Popsicle”.

Also Read: Warren Suggests Apple to Buy More Shares

In March, Google released the first developer preview of Android P that was mostly focused on the changes that will affect developers and not on user interface (UI) adjustments.

Google added a built-in support for a notch cutting into the display at the top of the screen, called “display cutout support”.

The company also tweaked the look for the “Quick Settings” panel and the notification drawer with rounded corners. (IANS)

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EU Prepares to hit Google with Record Fine in Android Monopoly Case

As well as the fine, Google is set to be ordered to break its agreements with phone manufacturers

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Opponents claim that this constitutes abuse of Android's 74 per cent share of the European smartphone market and harms rival search engines and browsers.
Opponents claim that this constitutes abuse of Android's 74 per cent share of the European smartphone market and harms rival search engines and browsers. Pixabay

Google will be hit with a record European Union (EU) fine for using its Android smartphone system to fortify its search empire.

The fine — likely to be handed down on Tuesday or Wednesday — is expected to eclipse the 2.1 bn pound monopoly abuse penalty Google paid last year over its internet shopping business, and escalates the war between Silicon Valley and Brussels, The Telegraph reported on Saturday.

The European Commission’s competition chief Margrethe Vestager has been investigating Google for three years over complaints the company illegally forces smartphone manufacturers to install its apps.

It gives its Android software to phone manufacturers for free, but binds them to “exclusivity agreements” that force them to install Google’s web browser and search engine if they use the Google Play app store, the report said.

The commission has the power to fine Google up to 10 per cent of its parent company Alphabet's annual turnover, or 9.5 bn euro (8.4 bn pound)
The commission has the power to fine Google up to 10 per cent of its parent company Alphabet’s annual turnover, or 9.5 bn euro (8.4 bn pound). Pixabay

Opponents claim that this constitutes abuse of Android’s 74 per cent share of the European smartphone market and harms rival search engines and browsers.

Meanwhile, Google insists the agreements allow Android to remain free to manufacturers and help them compete against Apple.

The commission has the power to fine Google up to 10 per cent of its parent company Alphabet’s annual turnover, or 9.5 bn euro (8.4 bn pound).

Also Read: Google Rolls Out ‘Morse Code’ Support on Gboard for iOS

Although it is not expected to use the full extent of its powers, the fine is likely to be higher than the 2.4 bn euros Google was ordered to pay in June last year over claims it stuffed search results with its own shopping adverts, squeezing out price comparison services.

As well as the fine, Google is set to be ordered to break its agreements with phone manufacturers. This could mean more Android phones being sold without Google software installed, potentially boosting rival search engines and web browsers such as Microsoft’s Bing or Firefox. (IANS)