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Google Pay To Now Send SMS To Inform Users Each Time They Receive Collect Request

We are conscious of the responsibility that comes with this trust, Ambarish Kenghe, Director, Product Management

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Google Pay, SMS, Users
We are mindful that at Google Pay, users are entrusting us with their most sensitive asset - their money. Pixabay

To help users easily identify any suspicious transactions, Google Pay will now send app notifications as well as SMS to inform users each time they receive a collect request to highlight that approving the request will deduct money from their bank accounts.

“We are mindful that at Google Pay, users are entrusting us with their most sensitive asset – their money. We are conscious of the responsibility that comes with this trust,” Ambarish Kenghe, Director, Product Management, Google Pay said in a blog post on Wednesday.

“The above security features, and a lot more ongoing work in this direction, are a small example of how we keep our users safe,” Kenghe said.

In the last two years, instant bank-to-bank transfers via Unified Payments Interface (UPI) have become the preferred form of payment for millions of Indians, with many users adopting digital payments for the first time.

Google Pay, SMS, Users
To help users easily identify any suspicious transactions, Google Pay will now send app notifications as well as SMS to inform users each time they receive a collect request to highlight. Pixabay

Google Pay comes equipped with several of Google’s security infrastructure including scam protections.

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It uses Machine Learning-based scam prevention models, and also displays explicit “scam” or “stranger” warnings if a user receives a request from someone suspicious or not in their contacts, Google said. (IANS)

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Google Announces a New Initiative Called ‘Privacy Sandbox’ to Protect Users’ Privacy on Web

Recent studies have shown that when advertising is made less relevant by removing cookies, funding for publishers falls by 52 per cent on average

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google, online tracking
A man walks past a Google sign outside with a span of the Bay Bridge at rear in San Francisco, May 1, 2019. VOA

In a bid to protect users’ privacy as they open ads on the web, Google has announced a new initiative called “Privacy Sandbox” to develop a set of open standards to fundamentally enhance privacy on Internet.

Google said it will work with the web community to develop new standards that advance privacy, while continuing to support free access to content.

“Over the last couple of weeks, we’ve started sharing our preliminary ideas for a ‘Privacy Sandbox’ — a secure environment for personalization that also protects user privacy,” Justin Schuh, Director, Chrome Engineering, said in a blog post on Thursday.

The company also aims to ensure that ads continue to be relevant for users, but their personal data shared with websites and advertisers would be minimized by anonymously aggregating user information, and keeping much more user information on-device only.

According to the company, large scale blocking of cookies undermine people’s privacy by encouraging opaque techniques such as “fingerprinting”.

privacy, google
FILE -Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks during the keynote address of the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., May 7, 2019. VOA

With “fingerprinting”, developers have found ways to use information that vary between users — such as what device they have or what fonts they have installed to generate a unique identifier which can then be used to match a user across websites.

“Unlike cookies, users cannot clear their fingerprint, and therefore cannot control how their information is collected. We think this subverts user choice and is wrong,” said Google.

However, blocking cookies without another way to deliver relevant ads significantly reduces publishers’ primary means of funding, which jeopardizes the future of the vibrant web.

Also Read: Top Investor of Tesla Wants Elon Musk to Step Down as CEO

Recent studies have shown that when advertising is made less relevant by removing cookies, funding for publishers falls by 52 per cent on average.

“So we are doing something different. We want to find a solution that both really protects user privacy and also helps content remain freely accessible on the web,” said Google, asking for feedback on this approach from the web platform community, including other browsers, publishers and their advertising partners. (IANS)