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Google Removing Over 100 Scam Advertisements Every Second

The move came after scammers were found using Google's advertising system to create misleading ads

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Google introduced the Pixel series in 2016 and the rumoured upcoming smartphones would mark the third generation of the line. Pixabay
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Google is removing over 100 scam advertisements every second for violating its policies and will soon implement a verification programme to further weed out bad actors from its platform.

After The Wall Street Journal reported that scammers were purchasing search ads and “masquerading as authorised service agents for companies such as Apple Inc”, Google said on Saturday it is taking action against such scam artists.

“Just last year alone, we took down more than 3.2 billion ads that violated our advertising policies – that’s more than 100 bad ads per second,” said David Graff, Director, Global Product Policy at Google.

“We’re taking another step. We’ve seen a rise in misleading ad experiences stemming from third-party technical support providers and have decided to begin restricting ads in this category globally,” said Graff.

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Google on a smartphone device. Pixabay

In the coming months, Google will roll out a verification programme to ensure that only legitimate providers of third-party tech support can use its platform to reach consumers.

“One of our top priorities is to maintain a healthy advertising ecosystem, and that means protecting people from misleading, inappropriate and harmful ads,” Google said.

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The move came after scammers were found using Google’s advertising system to create misleading ads.

“The ads would display a link to Apple’s website, but the number in the ad would direct to a call centre that engages in tech-support scams.” (IANS)

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Google Sends Email to Employees Asking Them to Delete China Search Engine Memo

The China search engine would link users' search history to their personal phone numbers, according to the memo

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Google asks employees to delete China search engine memo: Report. Wikimedia Commons

In its bid to suppress a memo revealing information about a plan to launch a censored search engine in China, Google has sent an email to employees asking them to delete the sensitive document, The Intercept reported.

Authored by a Google engineer familiar with the project, the memo disclosed that the search system would require users in China to log in to perform searches.

Codenamed Dragonfly, the search engine would track the location of users and share the data with a Chinese partner who would have “unilateral access” to the data, said the report on Friday, citing the memo.

The news about Google’s plan to build a censored search engine in China broke in August when The Intercept reported that the search platform would blacklist “sensitive queries” about topics including politics, free speech, democracy, human rights and peaceful protest, triggering internal protests among some Google employees.

Two weeks after that report, Google CEO Sundar Pichai told the company’s employees that the China plan was in its “early stages” and “exploratory”.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai
Google CEO Sundar Pichai. (Wikimedia Commons)

A group of Google employees who were organising internal protests over the censored search system got access to the memo detailing information about the project.

The Google leadership, according to the The Intercept report, were furious when they discovered that the memo was being passed among employees who were not supposed to know about about the Dragonfly project.

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The China search engine would link users’ search history to their personal phone numbers, according to the memo.

This means if security agencies were to obtain the search records from Google, individual people could easily be tracked and users seeking out information banned by the government could potentially be at risk of interrogation or detention. (IANS)

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