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#SummerWithGoogle: Google Rolls out Summer Campaign For Kids

Google rolls out summer campaign to make kids Internet Awesome

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Google
Google's new Search feature gives single result to certain queries. Pixabay

Google India on Monday announced a fun, yet educational summer campaign that will help children across the country spend more time learning and making new discoveries, as well as teaching them how to become responsible explorers of the web.

As part of the campaign, named #SummerWithGoogle, Google assigned an activity to the kids. They will release one assignment every week for four weeks, the tech giant said in a blogpost.

The assignment ranges from exploring the country that is home to all the Pandas in the world on Google Earth, to saying ‘Gracias’ and ‘Por Favor’ as they learn phrases in Spanish and other languages on Google Translate, to taking dramatic virtual tours of museums to make their own gallery on Google Arts & Culture; and ultimately building their very own app to share their summer experience.

Each assignment will also carry questions on the four fundamental codes of being Internet Awesome and teach the young internet explorers a lesson or two on how to be — Internet Smart, Internet Alert, Internet Strong, Internet Kind and Internet Brave, the blogpost said.

Representational image.
Google on a smartphone device, Pixabay

Google has also partnered with “Kidzania” to set-up a “Summer with Google” experience zone where kids will be encouraged to take a virtual tour and learn about the essentials of being safe on the Internet.

“As a parent myself, it has always been a challenge for me to engage my kids meaningfully, summer after summer. And the struggle is real for many more parents,” said Sunita Mohanty, Director, Trust and Safety, Google India.

“Therefore, we partnered with our product leaders to bring parents, a series of activities they can do along with their kids to make this a memorable summer,” she added.

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On completing the tasks, upto 100 kids and their parents/ guardians, from across the country will get the opportunity to attend the summer camp with Google at Google Gurgaon or Hyderabad office, where they will get the first-hand experience of Google technology, indulge in fun activities and participate in quizzes.

“The entire campaign will combine real world projects with virtual learning experiences and will equip kids with the right digital skills so when they return to school post this summer, they are Internet Awesome,” Mohanty noted.

The assignments can be accessed on #SummerWithGoogle website and Google’s social media, the statement said. (IANS)

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Researchers: Video Games can Help Children Evaluate, Express and Manage Emotions

Emotional intelligence can be better explained when there are emotions involved from both sides

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Video games, Children, Emotions
Video games may improve the expression of emotions, but awareness and coping strategies can't be solely understood by games. PIxabay

While it’s commonly believed that video games are harmful for children, researchers have found that it can help them evaluate, express and manage emotions when used as part of an emotional intelligence training programme.

“Video games may improve the expression of emotions, but awareness and coping strategies can’t be solely understood by games. Emotional intelligence can be better explained when there are emotions involved from both sides,” Manish Jain, Consultant at BLK Super Speciality Hospital, Delhi, told IANS.

According to the study published in the Games for Health Journal, researchers from the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Italy developed an emotional intelligence training programme that integrated video games as experience-based learning tools.

The researchers created EmotivaMente, a video game, to enhance emotional intelligence among adolescents, perhaps the group that could benefit the most. They analysed 121 adolescents who participated in eight sessions.

Video games, Children, Emotions
While it’s commonly believed that video games are harmful for children, researchers have found that it can help them evaluate. Pixabay

“Games for health have been designed to address an increasing variety of issues. A relatively new health issue is emotional intelligence, which has implications for various health problems, including coping with stress,” said Tom Baranowski, Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in the US.

The preliminary evaluation indicated that video games enhanced the students’ evaluation and expression of emotions.

But some experts believe outdoor activities should be given more importance to develop emotional intelligence, which includes awareness of emotions, managing emotions effectively and maintaining relationships, in children.

“In the modern day where interaction is increasingly becoming online and more time is spent indoors, the right way to build emotional intelligence is people-to-people interactions and connecting, spending quality time with peers and family, learning through experiences and feedback,” Samir Parikh, Consultant Psychiatrist and Director at Fortis Mental Health Programme in Delhi, told IANS.

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“Video games are not the most prudent way to enhance emotional skills. Young people should have a well-balanced life with adequate outdoor activities and investment of time and energy in building relationships by working on communication and person-to-person connect,” Parikh said.

Sagar Lavania, Head of Department, Psychiatry and Mental Health, Nayati Medicity, Mathura, believes “human and one-on-one interactions are ideal ways to increase emotional intelligence, especially among adolescents, and can never be substituted by alternative methods”.

“However, if newer techniques are coming up, it needs to be thoroughly researched and supervised, keeping in mind the vulnerability of teenagers,” he remarked. (IANS)