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Google, US Budget Office Seek Huawei Ban Reprieve: Report

The NDAA, signed by the US President in 2018, includes a ban on US agencies, and on recipients of federal grants and loans, from doing business with Chinese firms or with contractors that make substantial use of the companies’ products

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Google, smart compose
The Google name is displayed outside the company's office in London, Britain. VOA

Google and the White House budget office are among the organisations that are seeking reprieve from ban on doing business with Chinese technology company Huawei, according to media reports.

Google has asked to be exempted from any ban on Huawei, warning the Donald Trump administration that it would risk compromising US national security if it went ahead with export restrictions on Huawei, according to a report in Financial Times.

Google executives worry that the ban would force Huawei to develop its own version of Android and the “hybrid version” of Android could pose security risks, according to the report.

In May, the Trump administration announced a fresh set of measures targeting Huawei, including giving the commerce department power to ban the Chinese firm from selling 5G equipment in the US, as well as a ban on American companies selling their products to the Chinese group, Xinhua news agency reported on Monday.

After the ban was imposed, Google suspended business with Huawei, cutting it off from potential updates to Android. Since then, however, the administration has granted a 90-day reprieve to companies to adjust.

US, Huawei CEO, China Ties
FILE – A man uses two smartphones at once outside a Huawei store in Beijing, May 20, 2019. VOA

In a separate case, the White House’s acting budget chief is pushing for a delay in implementation of key provisions of the law that restricts the US government’s business with Huawei, according to a Wall Street Journal report on Sunday.

The ban could lead to a “dramatic reduction” in the number of companies that would be able to supply the government, and would disproportionately affect US companies in rural areas where Huawei gears were popular, Russell T. Vought, acting director of the Office of Management and Budget, wrote in letters to Vice-President Mike Pence and 9 Congressmen.

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Vought has asked for restrictions on contractors and on federal loan and grant recipients to take effect 4 years from the passage of the National Defence Authorisation Act (NDAA), instead of the present 2 years, to give affected companies time to respond and give feedback.

The NDAA, signed by the US President in 2018, includes a ban on US agencies, and on recipients of federal grants and loans, from doing business with Chinese firms or with contractors that make substantial use of the companies’ products. (IANS)

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Cyber-Security Project of Google Named ‘Chronicle’ Imploads in Trouble

Originally announced as an independent start up in early 2018 by Google's parent company Alphabet, Chronicle was was supposed to "revolutionise" cybersecurity

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Chronicle
One of the reasons why Chronicle was folded back into Google is the fact that staff compensation became a sore point. Pixabay

Cybersecurity project of Google named “Chronicle” is imploding in trouble and some employees feel its management “abandoned and betrayed” the original vision, media reports said.

Chronicle’s CEO and Chief Security Officer have already left and the Chief Technology Officer is leaving later this month while other key officials are eyeing an exit, according to the Motherboard.

In June this year, Chronicle lost its status as an independent entity when it formally joined Google to become part of its Cloud security offerings.

One of the reasons why it was folded back into Google is the fact that staff compensation became a sore point, because Google reportedly didn’t adjust Chronicle staffers’ salaries and stock packages, which were lower than those for other Google employees.

Originally announced as an independent start up in early 2018 by Google’s parent company Alphabet, Chronicle was was supposed to “revolutionise” cybersecurity.

Chronicle
Cybersecurity project of Google named “Chronicle” is imploding in trouble and some employees feel its management “abandoned and betrayed” the original vision. Pixabay

It was supposed to be an independent start up with its own contracts and policies — at least, that’s what CEO Stephen Gillett wrote when the business was launched.

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Employees have left because of a combination of Chronicle losing its original vision, a distant CEO, a lack of clarity about Chronicle’s future, and disappointment that the start-up has been swallowed into Google, according to interviews with five current and former employees, the Motherboard report added. (IANS)