Tuesday February 19, 2019
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Gorilla Glass 6 To Be First Featured By OPPO

Gorilla Glass has been designed into more than six billion devices by more than 45 major brands

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OPPO launches first India R&D centre in Hyderabad. (Wikimedia Commons)

Global tech company Corning Incorporated on Monday announced that OPPO will be the first mobile device manufacturer to adopt its latest cover glass technology Gorilla Glass 6.

OPPO’s new flagship smartphone utilising Gorilla Glass 6 is slated to release in the coming weeks, the company said in a statement.

In lab tests, Gorilla Glass 6 survived 15 drops from one metre onto rough surfaces whereas competitive glass compositions, such as soda lime and aluminosilicate, did not survive the first drop.

“We are excited to have OPPO adopt Gorilla Glass 6,” John Bayne, Vice President and General Manager, Corning Gorilla Glass, said in a statement.

OPPO Adopts New Gorilla Glass 6 Technology. Flickr
OPPO Adopts New Gorilla Glass 6 Technology. Flickr

Unveiled in July, Gorilla Glass 6 is the company’s most durable cover glass to date.

“OPPO’s new flagship model will provide consumers, who depend on their smartphone for every interaction in their digital lives, increased protection against multiple drops,” Bayne added.

Also Read: Oppo Unveils A3s With Super Full-Notch Screen At Rs 10990 to Woo The Budget Smartphone User

Gorilla Glass has been designed into more than six billion devices by more than 45 major brands.

With its optical clarity, touch sensitivity, scratch resistance, efficient wireless charging and enhanced durability, Gorilla Glass 6 is set to enable new design trends. (IANS)

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Usage of Smartphones for Eye Check-up May Lead to Misdiagnosis

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised - with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent

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Using smartphones to capture photographs of patients’ eyes for check-up may lead to misdiagnosis as camera colour sensors vary and as a result, images of the same eye may appear different depending on the model of smartphone used, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests that calibration of phone cameras is vital to capture accurate data.

Eye examinations to look for redness in the eye can indicate a variety of conditions including conjunctivitis, dry-eye disease and tear-gland dysfunction.

Clinicians increasingly use smartphones in conjunction with ophthalmic imaging equipment, such as the eyepiece of a slit lamp, because of their portability, ease of use and relatively low cost.

The connectivity also allows for upload to the Cloud, which is useful for telemedicine – the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology – and Artificial Intelligence applications that store thousands of images from different institutions.

However, the autofocus algorithms and hardware specifications of cameras may be different for different manufacturers which means different cameras can produce different results for the same scene.

Switching mice destined to develop glaucoma to a low carbohydrate, high fat diet protects the cells of the retina and their connections to the brain from degeneration.
Low carb diet can maintain eyesight. Pixabay

“It is important that clinicians bear this in mind,” said lead study author Carles Otero from Anglia Ruskin University in England.

For the study, the researchers took 192 images of eyes using three smartphone cameras, two different lighting levels and two zoom levels.

The images were duplicated and one set was white balanced and colour corrected (calibrated) and the other left unaltered.

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The researchers took photographs in autofocus mode with the iPhone 6s, the Google Nexus 6p and the Bq Aquaris U Lite, and found that the iPhone results were significantly different from the other two devices, when computing relative redness of each eye, and when compared to a clinician’s diagnosis.

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised – with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent.

“Our results show that while the clinician’s subjective evaluation was not affected by different cameras, lighting conditions or optical magnifications, calibration of a smartphone’s camera is essential when extracting objective data from images,” Otero said. (IANS)