Monday March 25, 2019

Government escalates fight against Tobacco in India

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A man smokes a cigarette along a road in Mumbai, India, January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Shailesh Andrade

Tobacco usage is rampant in India. It is used in many formats: chew-able to smoking form. With a population over 1.2 billion, India has close to 300 million tobacco users. Indian governments have shown resolve to tackle this menace, particularly in last 13 years. Various legislations have been brought in at central level as well as state levels with mixed and varying results. Yet due to sheer size of population and rampant usage, India is facing no less than a sort of tobacco epidemic. Experts believe that deaths due to tobacco may reach 1.5 millions (15 lakh) per year by 2020. Now by taking on the issue of warning size on the packs, it seems government is taking the fight head on with tobacco companies who have strong lobbying capabilities and money to aid their efforts. – NewsGram

By Aditya Kalra

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – India’s health ministry on Tuesday ordered government agencies to enforce a new rule for bigger health warnings on tobacco packets, stepping up a fight against the $10 billion cigarette industry that has shut down its factories in protest.

The government wants manufacturers to cover 85 percent of a cigarette pack’s surface in health warnings, up from 20 percent now.

But ITC Ltd, part-owned by British American Tobacco, and Godfrey Phillips, partner of U.S.-based Philip Morris International, have opposed the measure, saying a parliament panel had suggested the health warning to be half the cigarette pack’s size.

K.C. Samria, a joint secretary in the health ministry, on Monday sought support of several other ministries, including foreign affairs and revenue department, to ensure strict implementation of the new rules, letters seen by Reuters showed.

A man smokes a cigarette (tobacco) along a road in Mumbai, India, January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Shailesh Andrade
Tobacco: A man smokes a cigarette along a road in Mumbai, India, January 6, 2016. REUTERS/Shailesh Andrade

(Reporting by Aditya Kalra; Editing by Sanjeev Miglani)

  • Santosh Varaganti

    first introduce a law to ban the sales of tobacco products near public and residential places. Should only be allowed to sell at specific places.

Next Story

Passive Smoking May Raise The Chances of Kidney Disease

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers

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Besides affecting your heart and lungs, exposure to second-hand or passive smoking can also raise the chances of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which can lead to renal failure, warns a new study.

The findings showed that individuals with less or more than 3 days of exposure per week had nearly double the risk of having kidney disease when compared with participants with no second-hand cigarette exposure.

“Second-hand smoke exposure at home or in the workplace is still prevalent despite legislative actions prohibiting public smoking,” said Jung Tak Park from Yonsei University in Seoul.

“This exposure was found to be clearly related with CKD, even with less-frequent amounts of second-hand smoke exposure,” Park added.

Smoking pregnant lady outside hospital.

For the study, published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the team included 131,196 non-smokers and were classified into three groups: no-exposure, less than three days per week of exposure, and three or more days per week of exposure.

Cigarette smoking and exposure to second-hand smoking have been linked with higher risks of various diseases.

Also Read- Alzheimer’s Drug Holds Promise For Rare Neurological Disease, Suggest Researchers

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), smoking tobacco is globally the second leading cause of heart diseases after high blood pressure.Nearly 12 per cent of cardiovascular deaths worldwide occur due to tobacco abuse and second-hand smoking.

The global health body states that of the seven million lives that tobacco claims worldwide each year, almost 900,000 are passive-smokers. (IANS)