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Government to Install Aerators in Taps Used in Government Buildings to Avoid Wastage of Water

All the ministries/departments are requested to issue directions to the concerned authorities to fit aerators in taps

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India, Government, Aerators
An aerator is a device that can control the flow of water from the water taps, thereby avoiding wastage. Pixabay

In a bid to avoid wastage of water, the Centre has asked all its ministries and departments to install aerators in the taps used in the government buildings.

An aerator is a device that can control the flow of water from the water taps, thereby avoiding wastage.

“All the ministries/departments are requested to issue directions to the concerned authorities to fit aerators in taps used in buildings of ministries/departments of Government of India thereby conserving a large amount of water,” read an office memorandum issued by the Jal Shakti Ministry last month.

“It is brought to the notice of this ministry that a simple device called aerator could control the flow of water from the taps and thereby help in conservation of water. Aerators are small attachments that are fitted at the end of the water taps or can be inserted inside the spout.

India, Government, Aerators
In a bid to avoid wastage of water, the Centre has asked all its ministries and departments to install aerators. Pixabay

“The aerators through their fine pores break the incoming stream of water into the sub-streams. Therefore, while the out-flowing water is sufficient for utilization towards cleanliness, wastage is prevented by reducing excess flow. This device substantially saves water with no sacrifice in water pressure and rinse ability of water,” it added.

It also said there is an increasing gap between water availability and demand, which highlights the need for conservation of water.

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“With water levels falling drastically and several states across India facing a severe water shortage, every small step taken in the direction of conservation of water would go a long way in tackling scarcity of water in the country,” it added. (IANS)

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Only 3% Indian Digital Marketers Calculate ROI Correctly: LinkedIn

According to a report by LinkedIn only 3% Indian digital marketers measure ROI correctly

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LinkedIn report
LinkedIn report says that very few Indian Digital Marketers can calculate ROI correctly. Pixabay

When it comes to measuring return on investment (ROI), only 3 per cent of digital marketers in India are calculating ROI correctly — one of the lowest among all regions and lower than the global average of 4 per cent, a LinkedIn report said on Wednesday.

While 78 per cent digital marketers in India claim to be measuring digital ROI long before a sales cycle has concluded, only 3 per cent of digital marketers are measuring ROI over a six-month period or longer.

This means that many marketers are likely not measuring ROI at all, said the ‘The Long and Short of ROI’ report by Microsoft-owned professional networking platform conducted among 4,000 marketing professionals across 19 countries, including India.

“The report highlights how Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance; they are thinking short-term and are measuring KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) instead of ROI,” said says Virginia Sharma, Director, Marketing Solutions – India, LinkedIn.

“Measuring too quickly can have a poor impact on campaigns, specifically in industries such as higher education and real estate where it can take months of consideration before sale,” Sharma added.

Most Indian marketers measure ROI within the first 30 days of the campaign, which results in an inaccurate reflection of the actual return, considering that sales cycles are 60-90 days or longer.

Measuring ROI- LinkedIn
The LinkedIn report found that Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance. Pixabay

Fifty per cent digital marketers rely on inaccurate metrics and use cost-per-click as their ROI metric, which does not show impact-per-advertising dollar spent.

As opposed to 58 per cent globally, 64 per cent Indian marketers acknowledged that they needed to show ROI numbers to justify spend and get approval for future budget asks.

This clearly shows how pressured Indian digital marketers are internally, hence rushing to measure and prove ROI, the report noted.

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While 60 per cent of Indian marketers who measure ROI in the short term end up having budget reallocation discussions within a month, 47 per cent of Indian digital marketers don’t feel confident about their ROI measurements today, the report added.

With over 60 million users, India is LinkedIn’s fastest-growing and largest market outside the US. (IANS)