Tuesday June 18, 2019

AIIMS to have forms in Hindi and English from now

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New Delhi: In a move that will facilitate patients to use Hindi for better communication at hospitals, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) has initiated the use of the language in all of its paper works. The initiative will greatly help non-English people to speak with the hospital officials thereby ensuring better healthcare facilities.

As per the directives from the Department of Official Language and Ministry of Home Affairs, all outdoor patient department(OPD) cards,  forms, stamps and other officials departments will be converted to bilingual format.

Earlier in September this year, the official languages coordination committee at AIIMS had written to all concerned department regarding the move.

“It is mandatory that forms meant for official purposes should be 100 per cent bilingual under the Department of Official Language goals as decided in its annual programme 2015-16. It is thereby directed that all the departments and centres should upload the prescribed and used the format of forms on AIIMS official website so that the language department can also know that Hindi is being used properly,” stated a letter written by Raj Kumar, senior financial advisor, Official Language office at AIIMS.

The Official Language Act states that all paper works including orders, resolutions, notices, forms, rules should be written in Hindi as well as in English.

In a bid to uphold the Hindi language, the Act has also directed nameplates, notice boards, forms, rubber-stamps, invitation cards and other stationary commodities of Indian offices abroad to be made in both Hindi and English.

To check whether all departments are using commodities in bilingual formats or not, the AIIMS coordination committee has even directed all offices to send in samples at the earliest.

“The institute is already using bilingual forms, some OPD papers and rubber stamps for the promotion of Hindi and for the ease of patients who don’t know English. There may be some departments using English forms and stamps, but the reasons behind this would be technical as names of some departments are too difficult to understand in Hindi for patients such as cardiovascular, brain and nephrology departments,” said Dr D K Sharma, Medical Superintendent, AIIMS.

“We will abide by the ministry’s directions and would soon convert all the stationary into Hindi and English. This is a good move and we should promote our national language,” he added.

A faction of the AIIMS was not completely happy with the move, citing that all existing material would be discarded and bringing in new stationaries would incur costs. They, however, accepted that the move would definitely promote Hindi besides helping the patients.

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AIIMS Prepares Research Project on Air Pollution’s Impact on Health

"People with respiratory problems are increasing. Apart from asthma patients, there were fresh cases who visited AIIMS owing to pollution,"

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AIIMS launches research project on air pollution's impact on health.

As the National Capital Region (NCR) battles poor air quality during winter, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) has started a research project to study the effects of air pollution on public health.

“Delhi’s air quality deteriorates every year during Diwali owing to multiple reasons like stubble burning and bursting of crackers. However, last year, when the air pollution level escalated, we noticed a surge in patients visiting AIIMS,” Dr Karan Madan, Associate Professor, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Sleep Disorders, AIIMS, who is part of this research programme, told IANS.

So the country’s premier medical research and referral hospital decided to conduct empirical research on the impact of air pollution on health.

For the study, titled “DAPHNE” (Delhi Air Pollution Health And Effects), AIIMS researchers have developed an air pollution sensor technology.

“This sort of study has not been earlier conducted in India. The device has been developed in a belt format which is very light and it gives clear continuous pollution data. The belt can be wrapped around the waist or on the arms,” Madan said.

air pollution, Pollution, pollutants
In this Sept. 19, 2018 photo steam and cooling towers of a lignite power plant are reflected in a pond in Peitz, eastern Germany. VOA

He explained that the device is wireless and directly sends data to a monitoring system through a Global Positioning System (GPS). AIIMS is primarily focusing on children suffering from pulmonary diseases like asthma, bronchitis and other breathing troubles — as well as pregnant women.

The device, which is to be worn by children suffering from asthma or bronchitis, will give an idea of the exposure level of air pollution when one is travelling in the school bus, at home, when in school, or outdoors while playing.

“On pregnant women, we are trying to see how pollution might affect the unborn child. We are also trying to figure out the birth rate issue from this study owing to poor air quality,” Madan noted.

Funded by the Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science and Technology, and Medical Research Council, Britain, the project is a collaborative effort of the the two nations.

In India, apart from AIIMS, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, IIT Delhi and GTB Hospital are also associated with the research.

India, air pollution, WHO, diwali, Pollution, Delhi, egypt, air quality
A man walks in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog in New Delhi, India. VOA

“While the data on asthma in children will be compiled at AIIMS, GTB Hospital will be following the cases of pregnant women,” Madan said.

The research process, initiated last year, began on a pilot basis two months ago. Dr Madan stated that around 10 children have been given this belt across Delhi NCR.

“So far, the project is going good and the readings have come accurate. The study will conclude next year and the report will be released,” he added.

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Talking about the rise in health hazards among residents in the National Capital Region and its surrounding areas, Madan said that AIIMS has witnessed an increase of 15-20 per cent in the number of patients with cases of respiratory problems like coughing, heavy breathing, asthma symptoms, and burning sensation in throat and nose.

“People with respiratory problems are increasing. Apart from asthma patients, there were fresh cases who visited AIIMS owing to pollution,” he stated. (IANS)