Saturday April 20, 2019
Home Politics Delhi govt te...

Delhi govt tells hospitals to treat dengue patients foremost

0
//

By NewsGram Staff Writer

New Delhi: The Delhi government advisory has asked city hospitals to postpone non-emergency procedures, including surgeries, to admit and treat dengue patients on priority. The order was issued to both government and private hospitals, telling them that no dengue patient should be turned away because of lack of beds.

dengue-2More than 830 dengue cases have been reported this year, 778 of which happened in August alone. Over 6,000 dengue cases were treated in 2010, and the number reported this year has been highest after in the past five years.

“We have told hospitals not to turn away dengue patients even if it means rescheduling all non-emergency procedures, including surgeries,” said Dr. Charan Singh, in-charge of the vector-borne control programme in the Delhi government. “No health institute, government or private, should refuse dengue patients,” he added.

The government has also asked hospitals to stock their blood banks adequately, and private blood banks have been told to provide platelets at nominal rates. To provide dengue patients with better treatment, government hospitals have also opened dengue and fever words.

“During this time, our medicine wards only admit fever and dengue patients. Still, the beds are not enough. We are forced to admit two-three patients per bed, but even that is not sufficient. We have put up temporary beds on stretchers and mattresses to accommodate patients,” said a senior doctor at Safdarjung Hospital. Doctors said most patients were put on saline drips and their platelet count was monitored. “Treatment is based on symptoms. But we have to admit patients who show signs of their platelet count dropping or those with very high fever and other complications. Patients can visit private hospitals daily and get their platelet count checked, but given the socio-economic profile of our patients, that is not possible,” said the doctor.

However, doctors in private hospitals have a different take saying that, considering the symptoms are mild in comparison to previous years, so the patient need not be admitted.

Next Story

1bn People Could be Exposed to Dengue, Zika by 2080

Dengue is the fastest growing mosquito-borne disease across the world today, causing nearly 400 million infections every year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO)

0
Aedes
Dengue is transmitted by the bite of the Aedes mosquito that typically attacks during day time. Pixabay

Global warming could expose as many as a billion people to mosquito-borne diseases including dengue and Zika by 2080, says a new study that examined temperature changes on a monthly basis worldwide.

The study found that with the rise in temperature, dengue is expected to have a year-round transmission in the tropics and seasonal risks almost everywhere else. A greater intensity of infections is also predicted.

To understand, researchers from Georgetown University in the US looked at temperatures month by month to project the risks through 2050 and 2080.

While almost all of the world’s population could be exposed at some point in the next 50 years, places like Europe, North America, and high elevations in the tropics that used to be too cold for the viruses will face new diseases like dengue.

On the other hand, in areas with the worst climate increase, including west Africa and southeast Asia, serious reductions are expected for the Aedes albopictus mosquito, most noticeably in southeast Asia and west Africa, revealed the study, published in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Dengue vaccine.
A Manila Health officer shows off a pair of vials of the anti-dengue vaccine Dengvaxia after being recalled from local government health centers Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 in Manila, Philippines. The World Health Organization says the first-ever vaccine for dengue needs to be dealt with in “a much safer way,” meaning that the shot should mostly be given to people who have previously been infected with the disease. VOA

Both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes can carry dengue, chikunguyna and Zika viruses, as well as at least a dozen other emerging diseases.

“Climate change is the largest and most comprehensive threat to global health security,” said Colin J. Carlson, postdoctoral candidate in Georgetown University in the US.

“The risk of disease transmission is a serious problem, even over the next few decades,” Carlson added.

Also Read- Researchers Probing if Tobacco’s Native Forms Less Harmful

Dengue is the fastest growing mosquito-borne disease across the world today, causing nearly 400 million infections every year, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

The 2018 data from the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) and National Health Profile showed that cases of dengue increased 300 per cent — from less than 60,000 cases in 2009, it increased to 188,401 in 2017. (IANS)