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Green India: Govt to increase renewable power generation to 29,800 MW, says Goyal

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By Newsgram Staff Writer

India ranks 4th in the world in terms of energy generation and the government is planning to increase its productivity, with a special emphasis on the green energy sector, said Piyush Goyal, Minister of state for Power, Coal & New and Renewable Energy in Rajya Sabha.

He said that the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy is increasing its renewable energy generation target to 29,800 MW. This will include 15,000 MW from wind, 10,000 MW from solar, 2,100 MW from small hydro and 2,700 MW from bio-power.

The minister told the house that the government is providing a range of fiscal and financial incentives for the promotion of renewable energy under various schemes. For solar power generation, the ministry is implementing a ‘Grid Connected Rooftop and Small Solar Power Plants Programme’ that encourages the installation of solar rooftop systems apart from giving subsidies for the same.

The government has decided to reduce the subsidy on rooftop solar power plants to 15% from 30% due to the decline in price of solar panels, Goyal said and added,” The Department of Financial services has also instructed the Public Sector Banks  to encourage home improvement loan seekers to install rooftop solar PV plants and include cost of system in their home loan proposals.”

The ministry has also released a total of Rs. 957 crore towards Generation Based Incentive (GBI) for wind power producers to promote wind power projects through private sector investment.

Piyush Goyal also shed light on the ministry’s decision to increase renewable energy production and consumption in the agrarian sector. A solar pumping program has been launched for irrigation and drinking water for 1,00,000 pumps during 2014-15. The Minister further stated that for this purpose, Rs 400 Crores have been allocated for current Financial Year.

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NASA’s instrument to measure Sun’s energy

For instance, spectral irradiance measurements of the Sun's ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer -- Earth's natural sunscreen

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NASA, Pixabay
  • NASA’s new instrument can measure Sun’s incoming energy
  • The instrument is called Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1)
  • This can help bring in an energy revolution in future

To continue long-term measurements of the Sun’s incoming energy, NASA has powered on a new instrument installed on the International Space Station (ISS).

Sun
Solar energy is one of the biggest energy sources in the world.

The instrument, Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1), became fully operational with all instruments collecting science data as of this March, NASA said.

“TSIS-1 extends a long data record that helps us understand the Sun’s influence on Earth’s radiation budget, ozone layer, atmospheric circulation, and ecosystems, and the effects that solar variability has on the Earth system and climate change,” said Dong Wu, TSIS-1 project scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. TSIS-1 studies the total amount of light energy emitted by the Sun using the Total Irradiance Monitor, one of two sensors onboard.

Also Read: Why is the Sun’s atmosphere much hotter than its surface

This sensor’s data will give scientists a better understanding of Earth’s primary energy supply and provide information to help improve models simulating the planet’s climate.

The second onboard sensor, called the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, measures how the Sun’s energy is distributed over the ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions of light. Measuring the distribution of the Sun’s energy is important because each wavelength of light interacts with the Earth’s atmosphere differently.

Measuring solar energy is one big technological developement. Pixabay

For instance, spectral irradiance measurements of the Sun’s ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer — Earth’s natural sunscreen that protects life from harmful radiation.

“All systems are operating within their expected ranges,” said Peter Pilewskie, TSIS-1 lead scientist at the University of Colorado Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in the US. IANS