Sunday June 16, 2019

Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth

The colour in foods comes from chromogens, highly pigmented molecules which easily adhere to tooth enamel, reports femalefirst.co.uk

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Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth
Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth. Pixabay

Consuming green vegetables is the best way to stay healthy and the current trend for green smoothies can be called a great help too, but it could dull your smile as it stains teeth.

The colour in foods comes from chromogens, highly pigmented molecules which easily adhere to tooth enamel, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

The staining action is increased if food high in chromogens are combined with tannins, found in citrus foods and legumes as well as tea and coffee, as tannins boost chromogens’ ability to stick to the enamel.

Green Smoothie.
Green Smoothie. Pixabay

However, you don’t have to sacrifice your morning green boost to keep your teeth gleaming. One just needs to keep in mind a few steps to take care of teeth soon after having green smoothies.

* To further prevent staining, drink your smoothie through a straw, minimising contact with teeth.

Also Read: How to Detox in Healthy Way

* Don’t mix chromogens and tannins, so omit citrus fruit from your smoothie mix.

* Brush three times daily as it can help in keeping the shine of teeth intact. (Bollywood Country)

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Chatting on Food Habits Makes Kids Healthier: Study

For the study, the research team picked 87 children and ran an experiment where they offered healthy foods to a group of 3-to-5-year-old children for six weeks

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Avoid fad diet
Good food habits help you to strike balance between your daily life and health

Parents, please take note. Talking about food benefits is likely to get your kid to eat healthier, which might help them to grow bigger and run faster, says a study.

The study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behaviour, shows that the researchers found affirming statements were more effective at getting kids to make healthy food choices than presenting the food repeatedly without conversation.

The researchers found that kids ate twice as much healthy food when they were told how it would benefit them in terms they could understand as opposed to when they were given the food with no contextual information.

“Every child wants to be bigger, faster, able to jump higher,” said study lead author Jane Lanigan, Associate Professor at Washington State University in the US.

junk food, depression
Junk food is not only harmful for metabolism but also increases the risk of psychological problems. Pixabay

“Using these types of examples made the food more attractive to eat,” Lanigan said.

The researchers wanted to see if child-centred nutrition phrases (CCNPs), affirmative statements that simply convey the benefits of healthy food, influenced young children to make healthier food choices.

Also Read- 70% of Mothers in India Claim to Use Smartphone For Parenting

For the study, the research team picked 87 children and ran an experiment where they offered healthy foods to a group of 3-to-5-year-old children for six weeks.

“We found that a month later, the kids ate twice as much of their CCNP food with the repeated exposure compared to the food without the positive words. For example, when we presented lentils we would say, ‘This will help you grow bigger and run faster’,” said Lanigan. (IANS)