Wednesday March 20, 2019

Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth

The colour in foods comes from chromogens, highly pigmented molecules which easily adhere to tooth enamel, reports femalefirst.co.uk

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Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth
Green Smoothies Good For Health, But Not For Teeth. Pixabay

Consuming green vegetables is the best way to stay healthy and the current trend for green smoothies can be called a great help too, but it could dull your smile as it stains teeth.

The colour in foods comes from chromogens, highly pigmented molecules which easily adhere to tooth enamel, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

The staining action is increased if food high in chromogens are combined with tannins, found in citrus foods and legumes as well as tea and coffee, as tannins boost chromogens’ ability to stick to the enamel.

Green Smoothie.
Green Smoothie. Pixabay

However, you don’t have to sacrifice your morning green boost to keep your teeth gleaming. One just needs to keep in mind a few steps to take care of teeth soon after having green smoothies.

* To further prevent staining, drink your smoothie through a straw, minimising contact with teeth.

Also Read: How to Detox in Healthy Way

* Don’t mix chromogens and tannins, so omit citrus fruit from your smoothie mix.

* Brush three times daily as it can help in keeping the shine of teeth intact. (Bollywood Country)

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Researchers Identify Climate-friendly Diets Are Also Healthier

"We can have both. We can have healthier diets and reduce our food-related emissions. And it doesn't require the extreme of eliminating foods entirely," Rose said.

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The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons
The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons

After examining the carbon footprint of what more than 16,000 Americans eat in a day, researchers have identified that more climate-friendly diets are also healthier, according to a study.

“People whose diets had a lower carbon footprint were eating less red meat and dairy — which contribute to a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions and are high in saturated fat — and consuming more healthy foods like poultry, whole grains and plant-based proteins,” said lead author Diego Rose from the Tulane University in New Orleans.

For the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers built an extensive database of the greenhouse gas emissions related to the production of foods and linked it to a large federal survey that asked people what they ate over a 24-hour period.

They ranked diets by the amount of greenhouse gas emissions per 1,000 calories consumed and divided them into five equal groups.

Then they rated the nutritional value of foods consumed in each diet using the US Healthy Eating Index, a federal measure of diet quality, and compared the lowest to the highest-impact groups on this and other measures.

Americans in the lowest carbon footprint group ate a healthier diet, as measured by this index. However, these diets also contained more of some low-emission items that aren’t healthy, namely added sugars and refined grains.

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Climate-friendly diets are also healthier: Study. Flickr

They also had lower amounts of important nutrients — such as iron, calcium, and vitamin D — likely because of the lower intakes of meat and dairy.

According to the researcher, overall, diets in the lowest impact group were healthier, but not on all measures. This is because diets are complex with many ingredients that each influence nutritional quality and environmental impacts.

Diets in the highest impact group accounted for five times the emissions of those in the lowest impact group. The highest impact diets had greater quantities of meat (beef, veal, pork and game), dairy and solid fats per 1000 calories than the low-impact diets.

Also Read- About 8,000 Facebook Users Die Daily, is Your Digital Will Ready?

“We can have both. We can have healthier diets and reduce our food-related emissions. And it doesn’t require the extreme of eliminating foods entirely,” Rose said.

“For example, if we reduce the amount of red meat in our diets, and replace it with other protein foods such as chicken, eggs, or beans, we could reduce our carbon footprint and improve our health at the same time.” (IANS)