Monday December 17, 2018

Green spaces and Woods likely to trigger Positive changes in Brains of Elderly people living in Urban areas: Study

0
//
FILE - An elderly couple walks down a hall in Easton, Pennsylvania, Nov. 6, 2015. -VOA
Republish
Reprint

London, April 11, 2017: A walk in the woods and green spaces is likely to trigger changes in the levels of excitement, engagement and frustration in the brains of the elderly people living in urban areas, a study has found.

The findings have important implications for architects, planners and health professionals as the world deals with an ageing population, the researchers said.

“Urban green space has a role to play in contributing to a supportive city environment for older people through mediating the stress induced by built up settings,” said Chris Neale, research student at the University of York.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The study was published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

For the study, the team recruited eight volunteers aged 65 and over and gave them a mobile electroencephalography (EEG) head-set which recorded their brain activity while walking through busy and green urban spaces.

The study revealed that the participants experienced beneficial effects of green space and preferred it, as it was calming and quieter.

“In a time of austerity, when greens spaces are possibly under threat, we have demonstrated that these areas are important to people’s health. Maintaining access to green space could be a relatively low-cost option for improving mental well being of the elderly,” Neale said. (IANS)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

USA: Everything you want to know about Security Clearance; Find out here!

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas.

0
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA
Former CIA Director John O. Brennan speaks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, March 11, 2014. President Donald Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance Wednesday. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan. We take a look at what that means.

What is a security clearance?

A security clearance allows a person access to classified national security information or restricted areas after completion of a background check. The clearance by itself does not guarantee unlimited access. The agency seeking the clearance must determine what specific area of information the person needs to access.

What are the different levels of security clearance?

There are three levels: Confidential, secret and top secret. Security clearances don’t expire. But, top secret clearances are reinvestigated every five years, secret clearances every 10 years and confidential clearances every 15 years.

All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA
All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance. VOA

Who has security clearances?

According to a Government Accountability Office report released last year, about 4.2 million people had a security clearance as of 2015, they included military personnel, civil servants, and government contractors.

Why does one need a security clearance in retirement?

Retired senior intelligence officials and military officers need their security clearances in case they are called to consult on sensitive issues.

Also Read: Governments Across The World Request Apple for 30,000 Device Information

Can the president revoke a security clearance?

Apparently. But there is no precedent for a president revoking someone’s security clearance. A security clearance is usually revoked by the agency that sought it for an employee or contractor. All federal agencies follow a list of 13 potential justifications for revoking or denying a clearance, which can include criminal acts, lack of allegiance to the United States, behavior or situation that could compromise an individual and security violations. (VOA)