Saturday May 25, 2019

Green Tea, Carrots May Show Promise Against Alzheimer’s, Says Study

The researchers noted that many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments

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In Alzheimer's disease, patients start losing memory. Pixabay

A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer’s-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, an advance that could one day pave the way for treatment of dementia in humans, say researchers.

The study, led by the University of Southern California in the US, supports the idea that combination therapy, rather than a single magic bullet, may offer the best approach to treating people living with Alzheimer’s.

Combination treatment is already the standard of care for diseases such as cancer, HIV infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

The findings, published in the journal Biological Chemistry, showed that a combination of EGCG, or epigallocatechin-3-gallate – found in green tea; and FA, or ferulic acid – found in carrots, tomatoes, rice, wheat and oats, completely restored spatial working memory.

After three months of treatment, the Alzheimer’s mice performed just as well as the healthy comparison mice.

A lady suffering from Alzheimer’s. Flickr

“You don’t have to wait 10 to 12 years for a designer drug to make it to the market. You can make these dietary changes today. I find that very encouraging,” said Terrence Town, Professor at the varsity.

For the study, the researchers assigned 32 mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms to one of four groups with an equal number of males and females for three months.

The dosage was 30 milligrams per kilogram of body weight – a dosage well-tolerated by humans and easily consumed as part of a healthy diet.

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The researchers noted that many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments.

However, the findings lend credence to the idea that certain readily available, plant-based supplements might offer protection against dementia in humans, they said. (IANS)

Next Story

Smartphone Game can Help Detect Alzheimer’s Risk

The team studied gaming data taken from 27,108 UK players, aged 50-75 years and the most vulnerable age-group to develop Alzheimer’s in the next decade. They compared this benchmark data with a smaller lab-based group of 60 people who underwent genetic testing

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In Alzheimer's disease, patients start losing memory. Pixabay

A specially designed smartphone game can detect people at the risk of developing Alzheimer’s, say researchers.

The game called Sea Hero Quest, downloaded and played by over 4.3 million people worldwide, helped researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA) better understand dementia by seeing how the brain works in relation to spatial navigation.

The game has been developed by Deutsche Telekom in partnership with Alzheimer’s Research UK, University College London (UCL) and the University of East Anglia.

“Dementia will affect 135 million people worldwide by 2050. We need to identify people to reduce their risk of developing dementia,” said Lead researcher Professor Michael Hornberger from UEA’s Norwich Medical School.

As players made their way through mazes of islands and icebergs, the research team translated every 0.5 seconds of gameplay into scientific data. The team studied how people who are genetically pre-disposed to Alzheimer’s play the game compared with those who are not.

A lady suffering from Alzheimer’s. Flickr

The results, published in the journal PNAS, showed people genetically at risk of developing Alzheimer’s can be distinguished from those who are not on specific levels of the Sea Hero Quest game.

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The findings are particularly important because a standard memory and thinking test cannot distinguish between the risk and non-risk groups. “Our findings show we can reliably detect such subtle navigation changes in at-genetic-risk of Alzheimer’s compared with healthy people without any symptoms or complaints,” said Hornberger.

The team studied gaming data taken from 27,108 UK players, aged 50-75 years and the most vulnerable age-group to develop Alzheimer’s in the next decade. They compared this benchmark data with a smaller lab-based group of 60 people who underwent genetic testing. (IANS)