Tuesday October 22, 2019

Green Tea, Carrots May Show Promise Against Alzheimer’s, Says Study

The researchers noted that many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments

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In Alzheimer's disease, patients start losing memory. Pixabay

A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer’s-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, an advance that could one day pave the way for treatment of dementia in humans, say researchers.

The study, led by the University of Southern California in the US, supports the idea that combination therapy, rather than a single magic bullet, may offer the best approach to treating people living with Alzheimer’s.

Combination treatment is already the standard of care for diseases such as cancer, HIV infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

The findings, published in the journal Biological Chemistry, showed that a combination of EGCG, or epigallocatechin-3-gallate – found in green tea; and FA, or ferulic acid – found in carrots, tomatoes, rice, wheat and oats, completely restored spatial working memory.

After three months of treatment, the Alzheimer’s mice performed just as well as the healthy comparison mice.

A lady suffering from Alzheimer’s. Flickr

“You don’t have to wait 10 to 12 years for a designer drug to make it to the market. You can make these dietary changes today. I find that very encouraging,” said Terrence Town, Professor at the varsity.

For the study, the researchers assigned 32 mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms to one of four groups with an equal number of males and females for three months.

The dosage was 30 milligrams per kilogram of body weight – a dosage well-tolerated by humans and easily consumed as part of a healthy diet.

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The researchers noted that many mouse discoveries never translate into human treatments.

However, the findings lend credence to the idea that certain readily available, plant-based supplements might offer protection against dementia in humans, they said. (IANS)

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Tea Drinkers Have Healthier Brain Functioning, Research Suggests

Tea drinkers have better organised brain regions and this is associated with healthy cognitive function as compared to non-tea drinkers, research suggests

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Green Tea, Brain, Research, Tea
Matcha is the finely ground powder of new leaves from shade-grown (90 per cent shade) Camellia sinensis green tea bushes. Wikimedia Commons

Research suggests that regular tea drinkers have better organised brain regions and this is associated with healthy cognitive function as compared to non-tea drinkers.

“Our results offer the first evidence of positive contribution of tea drinking to brain structure, and suggest that drinking tea regularly has a protective effect against age-related decline in brain organisation,” according to a study authored by Feng Lei, Assistant Professor from the National University of Singapore.

Previous researchers have demonstrated that tea intake is beneficial to human health and the positive effects include mood improvement and cardiovascular disease prevention.

Green Tea, Brain, Research, Tea
Tea drinkers have better organised brain regions and this is associated with healthy cognitive function as compared to non-tea drinkers. Wikimedia Commons

For the study published in the journal Aging, the research team recruited 36 adults aged 60 and above and gathered data about their health, lifestyle and psychological well-being.

The elderly participants also had to undergo neuropsychological tests and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The study was carried out from 2015 to 2018.

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Upon analysing the participants’ cognitive performance and imaging results, the research team found that individuals who consumed either green tea, oolong tea, or black tea at least four times a week for about 25 years had brain regions that were interconnected in a more efficient way.

“We have shown in our previous studies that tea drinkers had better cognitive function as compared to non-tea drinkers,” Lei said.

“Our current results relating to brain network indirectly support our previous findings by showing that the positive effects of regular tea drinking are the result of improved brain organisation brought about by preventing disruption to interregional connections,” he added. (IANS)