Wednesday January 29, 2020

Drinking Green Tea Can Help Reduce Obesity, Inflammation

Drinking green tea has also been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart and liver disease

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Green tea is the second most consumed beverage.
Green tea is believed to have therapeutic intervention to cure a variety of diseases. Pixabay

Want to cut that extra flab? Drinking green tea can help reduce obesity as well as inflammation in the gut, finds a study.

The findings, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, showed that mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with green tea gained about 20 per cent less weight and had lower insulin resistance than mice fed an otherwise identical diet without tea.

Mice fed a diet of two per cent green tea extract had an improved gut health including more beneficial microbes in the intestines and less permeability in the intestinal wall — a condition called “leaky gut” — than those that ate a diet without it.

Leaky gut is a problem in humans that contributes to widespread low-grade inflammation.

“This study provides evidence that green tea encourages the growth of good gut bacteria, and that leads to a series of benefits that significantly lower the risk of obesity,” said lead author Richard Bruno, Professor at the Ohio State University.

Green tea. Pixabay

For eight weeks, the team fed half of the male mice a high-fat diet that causes obesity and half were fed a regular diet. In each of those groups, half ate green tea extract mixed with their food.

Female mice were not included as they are resistant to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

Green tea also protected against the movement of endotoxin — the toxic bacterial component — out of their guts and into the bloodstream.

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“Consuming a little throughout the course of a day with food might be better,” Bruno said.

Drinking green tea has also been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart and liver disease. (IANS)

Next Story

Weight-Loss Surgery May Help in Reducing Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Study

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals

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Cancer
Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer. Pixabay

Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

The study, published in the British Journal of Surgery (BJS), showed that patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a greater than 35 per cent reduction in the risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with obese individuals who had no surgery.

“Day by day, the scientific community is continuing to uncover the benefits of weight- loss surgery, and this paper affirms this,” said study lead author Sulaiman Almazeedi from Jaber Al-Ahmed Hospital in Kuwait.

“Obesity today remains one of the most preventable causes of morbid disease and early death, and despite the controversy, we believe weight-loss surgery can be an important tool in tackling this epidemic,” Almazeedi added.

Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer.

According to the researchers, the BJS analysis, which included seven studies with a total of 12,13,727 patients and an average follow-up of seven years, was conducted because individual studies have presented conflicting results.

Cancer
Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Pixabay

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals.

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The overall risk of developing colorectal cancer was three in 1,000 in patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery, compared with four in 1,000 in those who did not, the study said. (IANS)