Tuesday July 23, 2019
Home Lead Story Grief Is Bad ...

Grief Is Bad For The Heart: Study

Bereaved individuals are more susceptible to the negative health effects of poor sleep, the study said.

0
//
inflammation, grief
Why grief is bad for the heart Pixabay

Sleep disturbance among people grieving the recent loss of a spouse may put them at increased risk for cardiovascular illness and death, a study has warned.

Recently widowed people are more likely to suffer from sleep disturbances, such as insomnia, that may lead to increased levels of inflammation in the body.

Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases, showed the findings published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

The study found that the link between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher for the bereaved spouses.

sleeping, impairment, inflammation
The researchers found that the link between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher for the bereaved spouses.
Pixabay

“The death of a spouse is an acutely stressful event and they have to adapt to living without the support of the spouse,” said Diana Chirinos from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, US.

“Add sleep disturbance to their already stressful situation and you double the stressor. As a result, their immune system is more overactivated,” Chirinos said.

The study included 101 people with an average age of 67. Half were bereaved (identified through obituaries), and the rest were included in a control group.

The researchers compared the self-reported sleep habits of recently widowed people to the control group. Both the groups had sleep disturbances.

heart-rate, inflammation
Higher levels of inflammation may in turn increase risk for heart diseases (IANS)

The researchers found that the link between sleep disturbances and inflammation was two to three times higher for the bereaved spouses.

Also Read: Exposure to Arsenic, Lead May Spike up Risk of Heart Disease

Inflammation was measured by the level of proinflammatory cytokines, which are designed to be short-term fighters of disease but are linked to long-term risk for health problems including cardiovascular disease.

Bereaved individuals are more susceptible to the negative health effects of poor sleep, the study said. (IANS)

Next Story

Taking Hot Bath at Least 90 Minutes before Bedtime Your can be Ticket to Sound Sleep

Biomedical engineers at University of Texas-Austin reached this conclusion after analyzing thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating

0
Hot Bath, Sleep, Bedtime
Just remember that the water temperature should be around 40-42 degrees Celsius, else you may not get better shuteye. Pixabay

 Taking hot bath at least 90 minutes before bedtime is your ticket to sound sleep. Just remember that the water temperature should be around 40-42 degrees Celsius, else you may not get better shuteye.

Biomedical engineers at University of Texas-Austin reached this conclusion after analyzing thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality.

“When we looked through all known studies, we noticed significant disparities in terms of the approaches and findings,” said Shahab Haghayegh, lead author on the paper.

“The only way to make an accurate determination of whether sleep can, in fact, be improved was to combine all the past data and look at it through a new lens.”

Hot Bath, Sleep, Bedtime
Taking hot bath at least 90 minutes before bedtime is your ticket to sound sleep. Pixabay

In collaboration with the UT Health Science Center at Houston and the University of Southern California, the researchers reviewed 5,322 studies.

Meta-analytical tools were used to assess the consistency between relevant studies and showed that an optimum temperature of between 104 and 109 degrees Fahrenheit (40-42 degrees Celsius) improved overall sleep quality.

When scheduled one-two hours before bedtime, it can also hasten the speed of falling asleep by an average of 10 minutes.

It is understood that both sleep and our body’s core temperature are regulated by a circadian clock located within the brain’s hypothalamus that drives the 24-hour patterns of many biological processes, including sleep and wakefulness.

Also Read- Suffering From Low Blood Pressure? Do an Hour or More of Daily Exercise

The average person’s circadian cycle is characterized by a reduction in core body temperature of about 0.5 to 1 Fahrenheit around an hour before usual sleep time — dropping to its lowest level between the middle and later span of night-time sleep.

It then begins to rise, acting as a kind of a biological alarm clock wake-up signal.

The researchers found the optimal timing of bathing for cooling down of core body temperature in order to improve sleep quality is about 90 minutes before going to bed.

“If baths are taken at the right biological time — 1-2 hours before bedtime — they will aid the natural circadian process and increase one’s chances of not only falling asleep quickly but also of experiencing better quality sleep,” showed the findings appeared in the journal Sleep Medicine Reviews. (IANS)