Wednesday November 21, 2018

Gut Bacteria Has The Ability To Contribute to Diabetes

"Our findings show clearly how important the interaction between gut microbiota and diet is to understand our metabolism in health and disease," said Backhed

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Diabetes
Poor aerobic fitness can up diabetes, heart disease risk in kids. Pixabay
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Gut bacteria has the ability to affect how cells respond to insulin and can thus contribute to Type-2 diabetes, says a new study.

The study explored that the gut microbiota of people with treatment-naive Type-2 diabetes can be linked to a different metabolism of the amino acid histidine, which is mainly derived from the diet.

This in turn leads to the formation of imidazole propionate, a substance that impairs the cells’ ability to respond to insulin. Therefore, reducing the amount of bacterial-produced imidazole propionate could be a new way of treating patients with such disease.

“This substance does not cause all Type-2 diabetes, but our working hypothesis is that there are sub-populations of patients who might benefit from changing their diet or altering their gut microbiota to reduce the levels of imidazole propionate,” said Fredrik Backhed, Professor at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Cell, the research team involved 649 participants.

They used fecal samples and found that the microbiota of people with Type-2 diabetes produced imidazole propionate when histidine was added. However, this mechanism was not found in the diabetes-free control subjects.

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“Our findings show clearly how important the interaction between gut microbiota and diet is to understand our metabolism in health and disease,” said Backhed.

The result also shows that gut bacteria from different individuals can lead to the production of completely different substances that may have very specific effects in the body,” he noted. (IANS)

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Now Comes a Shoe Insole That Could Treat Foot Ulcers Caused Due to Diabetes

A patent is pending on the insole technology. The team is currently seeking corporate partners

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The findings, published in the journal Diabetologia, were based on data from nearly 2,800 children with a first-degree relative with Type-1 diabetes.
New shoe insole could treat diabetic foot ulcers. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a shoe insole that could help make the healing process more portable for people who develop ulcers as a result of diabetes.

Diabetic ulcers commonly result from high blood sugar damaging nerves, which takes away feeling from the toes or feet.

“One of the ways to heal these wounds is by giving them oxygen,” said Babak Ziaie, Professor at the Purdue University in the US.

“We’ve created a system that gradually releases oxygen throughout the day so that a patient can have more mobility.”

Without the ability to feel pain, hits and bumps tend to go unnoticed and skin tissue breaks down, forming ulcers.

A lot of sugar in the bloodstream, along with dried skin as a result of diabetes, further slow the ulcer healing process.

The researchers used lasers to shape silicone-based rubber into insoles, and then create reservoirs that release oxygen only at the part of the foot where the ulcer is located.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“Silicone is flexible and has good oxygen permeability,” said Hongjie Jiang, a post-doctoral researcher at the varsity.

“Laser machining helps us to tune that permeability and target just the wound site, which is hypoxic, rather than poison the rest of the foot with too much oxygen,” Jiang added.

In a paper published in the journal Materials Research Society Communications, the team said the insole can deliver oxygen at least eight hours a day under the pressure of someone weighing about 53-81 kg.

It can also be customised to take on any weight, the study said.

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The team envisions a manufacturer sending a patient a pack of pre-filled insoles customised to his or her wound site, based on a “wound profile” obtained from a doctor’s prescription and a picture of the foot.

“This is mass-customisation at low cost,” said Vaibhav Jain, research associate at Purdue.

A patent is pending on the insole technology. The team is currently seeking corporate partners. (IANS)