Monday June 18, 2018

How Gut Bacteria May Increase Obesity Risk

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, mentioned that the gut microbiota affects our metabolism and lead to cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes

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The presence of gut flora in the intestines may cause health benefits for some people, whereas it increases obesity risk in the others, researchers have claimed.

While sourcing a new link between gut bacteria and obesity risk, the animal-based study found that certain amino acids in our blood can be connected to both obesity risk and the composition of the gut microbiome.

ALSO READ: Children at Risk: Obesity is not limited to the Urban-Rich of India

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, mentioned that the gut microbiota affects our metabolism and lead to cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes.

obesity risk
Previous studies have shown that people with these diseases have a varying occurrence of different metabolites, that is small molecules or metabolic residues, in the bloodstream. Pixabay

 

The researchers analyzed blood plasma and stool samples from 674 participants in the Malmö Offspring Study (MOS).

ALSO READ: WHO Releases New Guidelines to Fight Global Childhood Obesity

They found 19 different metabolites that could be linked to the person’s body mass index (BMI); glutamate and so-called BCAA (branched-chain and aromatic amino acids) had the strongest connection to obesity.

“The differences in BMI were largely explained by the differences in the levels of glutamate and BCAA. This indicates that the metabolites and gut bacteria interact, rather than being independent of each other,” said Marju Orho-Melander, Professor at Lund University in Sweden.

Previous studies have also shown that the manipulation of the gut bacteria may cut down diabetes, bowel diseases, and obesity risk. (IANS)

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Obesity And Smoking: Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease

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Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment
Obesity And Smoking Becomes Roadblocks In Arthritis Treatment, Pixabay

Obesity in women and smoking among men could be major factors behind not achieving remission in rheumatoid arthritis, despite early treatment, researchers say.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects a person’s joints, causing pain and disability and can also affect internal organs.

The study showed that though early identification and aggressive treatment improve arthritis outcomes, six per cent of women and 38 per cent of men did not achieve remission in the first year despite receiving guideline-based care.

“Our results suggest that lifestyle changes — smoking cessation in men and weight reduction in women — as well as optimising methotrexate use may facilitate rapid reduction of inflammation, an essential goal of treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis,” said Susan Bartlett, professor of Medicine at McGill University in Canada.

The study, published in the journal Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, included 1,628 adults with an average age of 55.

The analysis highlighted that obesity more than doubled the likelihood of not achieving remission in women.

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obesity, Pixabay

In men, current smoking was associated with 3.5 greater odds of not achieving remission within the first year.

Further, almost all patients within the study were initially treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs), with three quarters being treated with methotrexate.

Analysis demonstrated that not using methotrexate significantly increased the likelihood of not achieving remission in women by 28 per cent and in men by 45 per cent.

Also read: drug free compound can ease arthritis pain

“These results highlight the need to support physicians and empower patients to take advantage of the impact lifestyle changes can have on disease progression,” Johannes Bijlsma, President, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), said in a statement. (IANS)

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