Monday June 24, 2019

How Gut Bacteria May Increase Obesity Risk

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, mentioned that the gut microbiota affects our metabolism and lead to cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes

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Old Couple. pixabay

The presence of gut flora in the intestines may cause health benefits for some people, whereas it increases obesity risk in the others, researchers have claimed.

While sourcing a new link between gut bacteria and obesity risk, the animal-based study found that certain amino acids in our blood can be connected to both obesity risk and the composition of the gut microbiome.

ALSO READ: Children at Risk: Obesity is not limited to the Urban-Rich of India

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, mentioned that the gut microbiota affects our metabolism and lead to cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes.

obesity risk
Previous studies have shown that people with these diseases have a varying occurrence of different metabolites, that is small molecules or metabolic residues, in the bloodstream. Pixabay

 

The researchers analyzed blood plasma and stool samples from 674 participants in the Malmö Offspring Study (MOS).

ALSO READ: WHO Releases New Guidelines to Fight Global Childhood Obesity

They found 19 different metabolites that could be linked to the person’s body mass index (BMI); glutamate and so-called BCAA (branched-chain and aromatic amino acids) had the strongest connection to obesity.

“The differences in BMI were largely explained by the differences in the levels of glutamate and BCAA. This indicates that the metabolites and gut bacteria interact, rather than being independent of each other,” said Marju Orho-Melander, Professor at Lund University in Sweden.

Previous studies have also shown that the manipulation of the gut bacteria may cut down diabetes, bowel diseases, and obesity risk. (IANS)

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Researchers Identify Gene Linked to Obesity in Children

Approximately 70 per cent of the human population carries at least one variant of this polymorphism, which is associated with an increased risk of obesity

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Researchers have identified a common gene variant that increases the risk of obesity in children.
In a study published in Obesity journal, the researchers from University of Columbia found that a specific variant (single nucleotide polymorphism) of a gene called “FTO” affects eating behaviour that may be predictive of subsequent weight gain in children, who are at obesity risk.
“Early identification of the physiology and behaviours that constitute early risk factors for subsequent weight gain will help inform best practices for intervention and prevention of obesity in children,” said study author Michael Rosenbaum, a professor at Columbia University.
“This study shows that even before the development of an obese phenotype, children at risk, in this case by virtue of a common genetic variant, exhibit increased food intake,” added Rosenbaum.
For the study, the researchers included 122 children in the 5-10 year age group.
Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body’s natural weighing scales.
The study discovered that children who are at risk of obesity due to this genetic variant had an increased calorie intake which may contribute to gaining excess weight.
“Even though 65 calories is not a lot per se, if this pattern generalized to multiple meals per week or day, this increased caloric intake can add up over time and may contribute to gaining excess weight,” said Rosenbaum.
According to the researchers, the report could be used to further study children at obesity risk for other reasons.
“The ultimate goal is to prevent the at-risk child or the child who has obesity from becoming an adult with obesity,” added Rosenbaum.
Approximately 70 per cent of the human population carries at least one variant of this polymorphism, which is associated with an increased risk of obesity. (IANS)