Wednesday March 20, 2019

How Gut Bacteria May Increase Obesity Risk

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, mentioned that the gut microbiota affects our metabolism and lead to cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes

0
//
Alzheimer
Old Couple. pixabay

The presence of gut flora in the intestines may cause health benefits for some people, whereas it increases obesity risk in the others, researchers have claimed.

While sourcing a new link between gut bacteria and obesity risk, the animal-based study found that certain amino acids in our blood can be connected to both obesity risk and the composition of the gut microbiome.

ALSO READ: Children at Risk: Obesity is not limited to the Urban-Rich of India

The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, mentioned that the gut microbiota affects our metabolism and lead to cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes.

obesity risk
Previous studies have shown that people with these diseases have a varying occurrence of different metabolites, that is small molecules or metabolic residues, in the bloodstream. Pixabay

 

The researchers analyzed blood plasma and stool samples from 674 participants in the Malmö Offspring Study (MOS).

ALSO READ: WHO Releases New Guidelines to Fight Global Childhood Obesity

They found 19 different metabolites that could be linked to the person’s body mass index (BMI); glutamate and so-called BCAA (branched-chain and aromatic amino acids) had the strongest connection to obesity.

“The differences in BMI were largely explained by the differences in the levels of glutamate and BCAA. This indicates that the metabolites and gut bacteria interact, rather than being independent of each other,” said Marju Orho-Melander, Professor at Lund University in Sweden.

Previous studies have also shown that the manipulation of the gut bacteria may cut down diabetes, bowel diseases, and obesity risk. (IANS)

Next Story

Research Reveals: It’s Your Friend’s Company That Can Turn You Obese

Social contagion in obesity means if more people around you are obese, then that may increase your own chances of becoming obese.

0
fries
Unhealthy food promotes obesity. pixabay

Besides genes and an unhealthy diet, your friends can also play a role in making you overweight, says a study, which found that obesity can spread through communities like a ‘social contagion’.

The study showed social circles can influence a person to become obese, suggesting the risk of becoming overweight increases if one moves to an area with a high rate of obesity, the Daily Mail reported.

family
On the other hand, the risk of the parent becoming obese or overweight went up five per cent for increase in every one per cent of obesity in the area. Pixabay

“Social contagion in obesity means if more people around you are obese, then that may increase your own chances of becoming obese. Subconsciously, you are affected by what people around you are doing,” said Ashlesha Datar at the University of Southern California.

“If you move to a community where a sedentary lifestyle is the norm, you join that. There is this social influence,” Datar said.

For the study, the team included 1,314 parents and 1,111 children of US Army personnel at 38 bases.

The chances of becoming overweight or obese for a teenager increased four-six per cent for rise in every one per cent in the obesity.

health
If you move to a community where a sedentary lifestyle is the norm, you join that. There is this social influence,” Datar said. Pixabay

On the other hand, the risk of the parent becoming obese or overweight went up five per cent for increase in every one per cent of obesity in the area.

Also Read: Authorities Scroll Through Social Media Violations Of Laws Restricting Political Parties, As It Forms Thailand’s Election “War Room”

The longer the families lived there, the more likely they put on weight, the report said.

Obesity can be caused by many variables, and previous research has shown living in certain communities carries a higher risk of obesity than living in other communities. (IANS)