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Serial Hacker Dumps 1bn User Records in 2 Months

The companies impacted include GameSalad, Estante Virtual, Coubic, LifeBear, Bukalapak and Youthmanual

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A serial hacker who goes by the name of Gnosticplayers has released another 65.5 million records of users last week taking his grand total of 932 million records overall.

Since mid-February, Gnosticplayers has been putting batches of hacked data on Dream Market, which is a dark web marketplace for selling illegal products like hacking tools guns and drugs.

“The hacker’s name is Gnosticplayers, and he’s responsible for the hacks of 44 companies, including last week’s revelations,” the ZDNet reported late on Monday.

The names of big companies that were hit included UnderArmor, 500px, ShareThis, MyHeritage and GfyCat.

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The hackers “exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation’s chapter websites – which we’re not naming – and downloaded the contents of each web server,” the report said. Pixabay

The releases have been grouped in four rounds — Round 1 (620 million user records), Round 2 (127 million user records), Round 3 (93 million user records), and Round 4 (26.5 million user records).

“Last week, the hacker notified ZDNet about his latest release — Round 5 — containing the data of 65.5 million users, which the hacker claims to have been taken from six companies: gaming platform Mindjolt, digital mall Wanelo, e-invitations and RSVP platform Evite, South Korean travel company Yanolja, women’s fashion store Moda Operandi, and Apple repair center iCracked,” the report added.

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Earlier in March, the serial hacker stole and posted personal data of close to 843 million users of various popular websites.

The companies impacted include GameSalad, Estante Virtual, Coubic, LifeBear, Bukalapak and Youthmanual. (IANS)

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Passwords on Sensitive Account Are Still Easy To Guess

The most common name to be used in passwords was "Ashley", followed by "Michael", "Daniel", "Jessica" and "Charlie".

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"Nobody should protect sensitive data with something that can be guessed, like their first name, local football team or favourite band," Pixabay

Millions of people are using easy-to-guess passwords on sensitive accounts, with “123456” being the most widely-used on breached accounts, suggests a security study.

The study by the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) helped to uncover the gaps in cyber-knowledge that could leave people in danger of being exploited, the BBC reported on Sunday.

For its first cyber-survey, the NCSC analysed public databases of breached accounts to see which words, phrases and strings people used.

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Security expert Troy Hunt, who maintains a database of hacked account data, said picking a good password was the “single biggest control” people had over their online security.
Pixabay

Top of the list was “123456”, appearing in more than 23 million passwords. The second-most popular string, “123456789”, was not much harder to crack, while others in the top five included “qwerty”, “password” and “1111111”.

The most common name to be used in passwords was “Ashley”, followed by “Michael”, “Daniel”, “Jessica” and “Charlie”.

When it comes to Premier League football teams in passwords, “Liverpool” came first and “Chelsea” second. “Blink-182” topped the charts of music acts.

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For its first cyber-survey, the NCSC analysed public databases of breached accounts to see which words, phrases and strings people used. Pixabay

People who use well-known words or names for a password put themselves people at risk of being hacked, said Ian Levy, technical director of the NCSC.

“Nobody should protect sensitive data with something that can be guessed, like their first name, local football team or favourite band,” he said.

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Security expert Troy Hunt, who maintains a database of hacked account data, said picking a good password was the “single biggest control” people had over their online security.

“We typically haven’t done a very good job of that either as individuals or as the organisations asking us to register with them.” (IANS)