Sunday January 19, 2020
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After 750 mn, Hacker Puts 93 mn More Users’ Data on Sale

While some of these websites - particularly MyHeritage, MyFitnessPal and Animoto - warned their customers last year that they had been compromised, several others have started notifying users about the hacks

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Due to its nature, the chip is physically unclonable and can, thus, render the device invulnerable to hijacking, counterfeiting or replication by cyber-criminals
Representational image. Pixabay

The hacker who earlier stole and posted data of close to 750 million users of various popular websites on a Dark Web marketplace has now put up the third set of nearly 93 million hacked databases for sale.

According to a report on zdnet.com late Sunday, the hacker this time is selling an additional 93 million user records from eight companies, including GfyCat which is a popular GIF hosting and sharing platform.

“The hacker is selling each database individually on Dream Market. Together, all eight are worth 2.6249 bitcoin, which amounts to roughly $9,400,” said the report.

The stolen information mainly includes account holders’ names, email addresses and passwords.

The hacker, who goes by the name Gnosticplayers, earlier posted a batch of 16 websites containing the data of 620 million users and a second batch of eight portals with the data of 127 million users, that included 18 million user records from travel booking site Ixigo and 40 million from live-video streaming site YouNow.

The hacker aims to sell over one billion user records and then disappear with the money.

Travellers
Travellers must take extra precautions to secure their systems and data when in foreign countries. Pixabay

His current total stands at roughly 840 million records.

“New leaks are coming, including one from a cryptocurrency exchange,” the hacker told ZDNet.

Earlier, the same hacker claimed he had more than 151 million records from MyFitnessPal and 25 million records from Animoto and many other from several major sites.

Also Read- Chinese Police Catches Hold of $1.5 Billion Money in Online Lending Scandal

It has been claimed that databases, which are aimed at making “life easier” for hackers, can be purchased from the Dream Market cyber-souk, located in the Tor network, for less than $20,000 in bitcoin.

While some of these websites – particularly MyHeritage, MyFitnessPal and Animoto – warned their customers last year that they had been compromised, several others have started notifying users about the hacks. (IANS)

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US Judge Orders Facebook to Disclose Malicious Apps’ Data: Report

The social networking giant found that the apps -- primarily social media management and video streaming apps -- retained access to group member information, like names and profile pictures in connection with group activity, from the Groups API (application programming interface)

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Social Media, Facebook, Authenticity, Posts
The social media application, Facebook is displayed on Apple's App Store, July 30, 2019. VOA

As part of a probe ordered in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica data scandal involving 87 million users, a US judge has ordered Facebook to hand over data of thousands of apps that violated its user privacy.

Facebook admitted last year that it suspended “tens of thousands” of apps for possible privacy violations.

A Massachusetts judge rejected the social networking giant’s attempts to withhold the key details from state investigators, The Washington Post said in a report on Friday.

“We are disappointed that the Massachusetts Attorney General and the Court didn’t fully consider our arguments on well-established law. We are reviewing our options, including appeal,” a Facebook spokesperson Andy Stone was quoted as saying in the report.

Maura Healey, the Democratic Attorney General of Massachusetts, said: “We are pleased that the Court ordered Facebook to tell our office which other app developers may have engaged in conduct like Cambridge Analytica.”

facebook, instant games
FILE – Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc’s F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, United States. VOA

The state of Massachusetts launched the probe last September after Facebook admitted that it had suspended “tens of thousands” of apps on its platform as a result of its review on privacy practices launched following the scandal involving Cambridge Analytica.

The review, launched in 2018, followed revelations that the political consultancy hijacked personal data on millions of Facebook users and included attorneys, external investigators, data scientists, engineers, policy specialists and others, according to a Facebook statement.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal resulted in a record-breaking, $5 billion fine for Facebook from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Also Read: I Fall in Love with India Every Time I Return Here: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

In November 2019, Facebook revealed that at least 100 app developers may have accessed Facebook users’ data for months, confirming that at least 11 partners “accessed group members’ information in the last 60 days”.

The social networking giant found that the apps — primarily social media management and video streaming apps — retained access to group member information, like names and profile pictures in connection with group activity, from the Groups API (application programming interface). (IANS)