Friday April 19, 2019
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Hackers can Easily Change Patient’s MRI, CT Scan Results

The researchers suggested several solutions, such as enabling encryption between the hosts in the hospital’s radiology network, digital signatures with a secure mark on each scan or hidden digital watermarks

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Patients’ CT and MRI scan results can be easily changed by hackers, thereby deceiving radiologists and Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms that diagnose malignant tumours, Israeli researchers have warned.

The researchers from the Ben-Gurion University (BGU) showed that hackers could access to add or remove medical conditions from lung cancer scans for the purposes of insurance fraud, ransom and even murder, Xinhua news agency reported.

As part of the attack, the hacker has full control over the number, size and location of the cancers while preserving the anatomy from the original, full resolution three-dimensional (3D) image.

To prove the feasibility of the attacks, the researchers broke with permission into an actual hospital network to intercept all CT (computed tomography) scans.

Although the hospital internal network is not connected to the internet, hackers can access it via the hospital’s WiFi or physical access to the infrastructure, the researchers said.

hackers, hacking group, military
iDefense said the hackers are likely affiliated with a group known as MUDCARP, and also referred to as TEMP.PERISCOPE, Periscope and Leviathan. Pixabay

To inject and remove medical conditions, the researchers used a deep learning neural network called a generative adversarial network (GAN), which has been used in the past to generate realistic imagery, such as portraits of non-existent people.

After the “attack” the radiologists at the hospital misdiagnosed 99 per cent of the scans showing malignant tumours, and 94 per cent of altered images with cancerous images removed.

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After the radiologists were informed about the attack, they still misdiagnosed 60 per cent of altered scans falsely showing tumours and 87 per cent of those falsely showing no sign of the tumour, the report showed.

The researchers suggested several solutions, such as enabling encryption between the hosts in the hospital’s radiology network, digital signatures with a secure mark on each scan or hidden digital watermarks. (IANS)

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Group of Hackers Upload Personal Data of US Federal Agents Online

The FBI is yet to speak on the incident

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Representational image. Pixabay

A group of hackers has broken into several FBI-affiliated portals and uploaded the contents online that contained personal information of federal agents and law enforcement officers.

According to a TechCrunch report late Friday, the hackers breached three websites associated with the FBI National Academy Association located at the FBI training academy in Quantico, Virginia.

The hackers “exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation’s chapter websites – which we’re not naming – and downloaded the contents of each web server,” the report said.

The hacker claimed to have “over a million data” on employees across several federal agencies and public service organisations in the US.

They also put the data up for download on their own website.

hacker
The hackers “exploited flaws on at least three of the organisation’s chapter websites – which we’re not naming – and downloaded the contents of each web server,” the report said. Pixabay

“We hacked more than 1,000 sites. Now we are structuring all the data, and soon they will be sold. I think something else will publish from the list of hacked government sites,” a hacker told TechCrunch.

The data contains member names, a mix of personal and government email addresses, job titles, phone numbers and postal addresses.

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The hackers, whose identity is still unknown whether they are an independent group or nation-state actors, used public exploits, indicating that “many of the websites they hit weren’t up-to-date and had outdated plugins”.

The FBI was yet to speak on the incident. (IANS)