Friday January 18, 2019
Home Lead Story Hackers ditch...

Hackers ditch ransomware attacks, move to cryptojacking: Symantec

Mobile users also face privacy risks from grayware apps that are not completely malicious but can be troublesome

0
//
cloudhopper
Hackers threaten to reveal 'secret' data linked to 9/11 attacks. Wikimedia Commons
  • Hackers are no more using ransomware attacks
  • They are now cryptojacking
  • India is the second largest Asian country which witness this

When it comes to increased cryptojacking activities, India is second in the Asia-Pacific and Japan (APJ) region and ninth globally as hackers create a highly-profitable, new revenue stream with crypto-mining, cyber security giant Symantec said on Wednesday.

According to Symantec’s “Internet Security Threat Report”, detection of coinminers on endpoint computers increased by a whopping 8,500 per cent in 2017.

cryptocurrency dealer Pluto Exchange on Thursday announced the launch of mobile application for transacting in VC. Wikimedia Commons
Coinmining is taking place in high number. Wikimedia Commons

“Cryptojacking is a rising threat to cyber and personal security,” Tarun Kaura, Director, Enterprise Security Product Management, APJ at Symantec, said in a statement. “The massive profit incentive puts people, devices and organizations at risk of unauthorised coinminers siphoning resources from their systems, further motivating criminals to infiltrate everything from home PCs to giant data centers,” Kaura added.

Cryptojacking is defined as the secret use of a computing device to mine cryptocurrency. With a low barrier of entry cybercriminals are harnessing stolen processing power and cloud CPU usage from consumers and enterprises to mine cryptocurrency. Coinminers can slow devices, overheat batteries and in some cases, render devices unusable. For enterprise organisations, coinminers can put corporate networks at risk of shutdown and inflate cloud CPU usage, adding to the cost.

Also Read: From paper to plastic to Bitcoins: Changing money with time

“Now you could be fighting for resources on your phone, computer or Internet of Things (IoT) device as attackers use them for profit. People need to expand their defenses or they will pay for the price for someone else using their device,” Kaura added.

Symantec found 600 per cent increase in overall IoT attacks in 2017. India today ranks among the top five countries as a source for IoT attacks. The firm also identified a 200 per cent increase in attackers injecting malware implants into the software supply chain in 2017.

Hacking puts a lot of things at risk. VOA

Threats in the mobile space continue to grow year-over-year, including the number of new mobile malware variants which increased by 54 per cent. Mobile users also face privacy risks from grayware apps that are not completely malicious but can be troublesome. Symantec found that 63 per cent of grayware apps leak the device’s phone number.

In 2017, the average ransom cost lowered to $522. “Several cyber criminals may have shifted their focus to coin mining as an alternative to cashing in while cryptocurrency values are high,” the report noted. IANS

Next Story

Hackers Claim to Have ‘Secret’ Data on 9/11 Attacks, Seek Ransom in Bitcoin

The group has threatened to release more documents

0
Cyber crime, U.S. programming
A man types on a computer keyboard in front of displayed cyber code in this illustration picture. VOA

A hackers group has threatened to reveal “secret” data related to September 11 attacks in the US after claiming to have got access to a large cache of confidential files.

In its announcement published on Pastebin, the group known as The Dark Overlord pointed to several different insurers and legal firms, claiming specifically that it hacked Hiscox Syndicates Ltd, Lloyds of London, and Silverstein Properties, the Motherboard reported on Tuesday.

“Hiscox Syndicates Ltd and Lloyds of London are some of the biggest insurers on the planet insuring everything from the smallest policies to some of the largest policies on the planet, and who even insured structures such as the World Trade Centers,” the group said in the announcement.

The group threatened that it would reveal the documents unless the victims pay them an undisclosed ransom fee in Bitcoin.

While it is not clear what exact files the group has got access to, it is trying to capitalise on conspiracy theories around the 9/11 attacks.

cloudhopper
Hackers threaten to reveal ‘secret’ data linked to 9/11 attacks. Wikimedia Commons

“We’ll be providing many answers about 9.11 conspiracies through our 18.000 secret documents leak,” the group tweeted on Monday.

A spokesperson for the Hiscox Group confirmed to Motherboard that the hackers had breached a law firm that advised the company, and likely stolen files related to litigation around the 9/11 attacks.

Also Read- India Planning to Launch 32 Space Missions This Year

The hacking group published a small set of letters, emails and other documents that mention various law firms, as well as the Transport Security Administration (TSA) and Federal Aviation Administration in the US, according to the Motherboard report.

The group has threatened to release more documents. (IANS)