Saturday January 25, 2020
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Iran-based Hackers Steal Data From Citrix

"Citrix deeply regrets the impact this incident may have on affected customers,"

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Representational image.
Iran-based hackers have stolen terabytes of data from desktop virtualisation leader Citrix, with the company admitting that the cyber criminals may have accessed and downloaded business documents.
“The specific documents that may have been accessed, however, are currently unknown. At this time, there is no indication that the security of any Citrix product or service was compromised,” Citrix Chief Information Security Officer Stan Black said in a blog post.
According to a report in The Registrar on Sunday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) last week warned Citrix about the data hack.
According to cyber security firm Resecurity, at least six terabytes of sensitive internal files were stolen by the Iranian-backed IRIDIUM hacker gang.
Cloudhopper, cyberattacks
Alister Shepherd, the director of a subsidiary of the cybersecurity firm FireEye, gestures during a presentation about the APT33 hacking group, which his firm suspects are Iranian government-aligned hackers, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. VOA
The researchers said they had alerted Citrix as early as December 28 last year about the ongoing attack.
“Citrix has taken action to contain the incident. We commenced a forensic investigation; engaged a leading cyber security firm to assist; took actions to secure our internal network; and continue to cooperate with the FBI,” Black wrote.
The hackers probably used a tactic known as “password spraying”, which exploits weak passwords. Once they gain a foothold with limited access, they worked to circumvent additional layers of security.
“Citrix deeply regrets the impact this incident may have on affected customers,” he said. (IANS)

Next Story

Hackers Use Data Protection Websites to Hack User Data: Study

In any possible scenario - be it the absence of the SSN or entering the correct existing SSN - the website alerts mistakes and offers to sell a temporary one for the $9 price

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Hackers
Experts at cybersecurity firm Kaspersky detected this new online fraud scheme where Hackers urge users to buy 'temporary US social security numbers' worth around $9 each. Pixabay

In a unique online fraud, hackers are tricking people into thinking that they own compensation after being victims of personal data frauds, and under the pretext of offering them money, are fleecing them, a new report said on Monday.

Experts at cybersecurity firm Kaspersky detected this new online fraud scheme where scammers urge users to buy ‘temporary US social security numbers’ worth around $9 each.

Victims were found in Russia, Algeria, Egypt and the UAE as well as other countries.

The scheme involves a website allegedly owned by the Personal Data Protection Fund, founded by the US Trading Commission.

The fund issues compensation to those who may have been subject to a personal data leak and is available to citizens from any country in the world.

For those interested, the site offers to check whether user data has ever been leaked.

For this, one needs to provide their specific surname, first name, phone number, and social media accounts.

Once this has been done, an alert is shown indicating that the user has experienced a leak, which can include data such as photos, videos, and contact information, entitling the user to compensation of thousands of dollars.

Hackers
In a unique online fraud, hackers are tricking people into thinking that they own compensation after being victims of personal data frauds, and under the pretext of offering them money, are fleecing them. Pixabay

“However, fraudsters do not just ask for a user to enter a bank card number and wait for the payment to be credited; users inevitably need to offer their own social security numbers,” the report noted.

In any possible scenario – be it the absence of the SSN or entering the correct existing SSN – the website alerts mistakes and offers to sell a temporary one for the $9 price.

Upon agreement, the victim is redirected to this payment form in Russian or English with the purchase price specified in rubles or dollars, respectively. The specific form depends on the victim’s IP address, the experts noted.

“The scammers themselves are most likely Russian speakers, as suggested by the request for payments in rubles, plus the suspicious similarity of the scheme to other easy money offers that regularly tempt residents of Russia and the CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States),” said Tatyana Sidorina, Security expert at Kaspersky.

The e-bait in those schemes varies — giveaways, surveys, secret retirement savings, even a part-time job as a taxi dispatcher — but they tend to be in Russian (as are some of the preceding links).

The bottom line is always the same: the juicy promise of quite a bit of easy money, followed by a demand to pay for an inexpensive service, be it a commission, a ‘securing’ payment, or a temporary SSN.

Hackers
“However, Hackers do not just ask for a user to enter a bank card number and wait for the payment to be credited; users inevitably need to offer their own social security numbers,” the report noted. Pixabay

“The new scheme is quite a topical one and is related to offering compensation for data leaks. Once some organizations have started to pay users, fraudsters decided there is a monetary opportunity for them as well,” Sidorina added.

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In order to stay protected from the potential risks of online fraud, do not trust payment offers, use trusted resources and utilize a reliable security solution, said the researchers. (IANS)