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Hackers Target 1 Indian Firm Over 1,500 Times a Week

Misconfiguration of cloud resources is still the number one cause for Cloud attacks, but now we also witness an increasing number of attacks aimed directly at Cloud service providers

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Bharat Bhise HNA, Hacker, Business
Hackers have the power to bring down your website or your entire network if they so wish. Pixabay

A single organisation in India was attacked an alarming 1,565 times per week on average in the past six months, compared to 474 attacks by hackers per organisation globally, says a new report.

According to researchers at Israeli cybersecurity firm Check Point Research, 93 per cent of malicious files in India were delivered via the web, compared to 35 per cent of malicious files globally.

The most common vulnerability exploit type in India is information disclosure, impacting 64 per cent of the organisations and the top malware in India is “XMRig” that impacts 17 per cent of firms, said Check Point’s ‘2020 Cyber Security’ report.

“2019 presented a complex threat landscape where nation states, cybercrime organisations and private contractors accelerated the cyber arms race, elevating each other’s capabilities at an alarming pace, and this will continue into 2020,” said Lotem Finkelsteen, Threat Intelligence Group Manager, Check Point Software Technologies.

It is pertinent to note that cryptominers still dominate malware landscape.

Even though cryptomining declined during 2019, linked to cryptocurrencies’ fall in value and the closure of the Coinhive operation in March, 38 per cent of companies globally were impacted by crypto-miners in 2019, up from 37 per cent in 2018.

This is because the use of crypto-miners remains a low-risk, high-reward activity for criminals.

“Detecting and automatically blocking the attack at an early stage can prevent damage. Check Point’s 2020 Security Report shares what organisations need to look out for, and how they can win the war against cyber attacks through key best practices,” Finkelsteen added.

Twenty eight per cent of organisations globally were hit by botnet activity, an increase of over 50 per cent compared with 2018.

Iranian, Hackers, Cyberattacks
FILE – In 2010, the Stuxnet virus disrupted operation of centrifuges at a uranium enrichment facility in Iran. VOA

Emotet was the most common bot malware used, primarily because of its versatility in enabling malware and spam distribution services. Other botnet actions such as sextortion email activity and DDoS attacks also rose sharply in 2019.

While the number of impacted organisations is relatively low, the severity of the attack is much higher — as seen in 2019’s damaging attacks against US city administrations.

Criminals are choosing their ransomware targets carefully, with the aim of extorting the maximum revenue possible.

Notably, 27 per cent of organisations worldwide were impacted by cyberattacks that involved mobile devices in 2019, down from 33 per cent in 2018.

While the mobile threat landscape is maturing, organisations are also increasingly aware of the threat, and are deploying more protection on mobiles.

Currently, more than 90 per cent of enterprises use Cloud services and yet 67 per cent of security teams complain about the lack of visibility into their Cloud infrastructure, security, and compliance.

The magnitude of Cloud attacks and breaches has continued to grow in 2019.

Also Read: 84% Indians Hope to Retain Their Jobs Despite Automation: WEF

Misconfiguration of cloud resources is still the number one cause for Cloud attacks, but now we also witness an increasing number of attacks aimed directly at Cloud service providers.

“Even if an organisation is equipped with the most comprehensive, state-of-the-art security products, the risk of being breached cannot be completely eliminated. Beyond detection and remediation, organizations need to adopt a proactive plan to stay ahead of cybercriminals and prevent attacks,” explained Finkelsteen. (IANS)

Next Story

This new Defence Tool May Help Fool Hackers

The approach aims to solve a major challenge to using artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity

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Cybersecurity
The approach aims to solve a major challenge to using artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity: a shortage of data needed to train computers to detect intruders. Pixabay

Instead of blocking hackers, the researchers have created a new cybersecurity defence approach, which involves setting traps for hackers.

The method, called DEEP-Dig (DEcEPtion DIGging), ushers intruders into a decoy site so the computer can learn from hackers’ tactics. The information is then used to train the computer to recognise and stop future attacks. DEEP-Dig advances a rapidly growing cybersecurity field known as deception technology, which involves setting traps for hackers.

“There are criminals trying to attack our networks all the time, and normally we view that as a negative thing, instead of blocking them, maybe what we could be doing is viewing these attackers as a source of free labour,” said study researcher Kevin Hamlen from University of Texas in Dallas, US. “They’re providing us data about what malicious attacks look like. It’s a free source of highly prised data,” Hamlen added.

The approach aims to solve a major challenge to using artificial intelligence (AI) for cybersecurity: a shortage of data needed to train computers to detect intruders. The lack of data is due to privacy concerns. Better data will mean better ability to detect attacks, the researchers said.

“We’re using the data from hackers to train the machine to identify an attack, we’re using deception to get better data,” said study researcher Gbadebo Ayoade. Hackers typically begin with their simplest tricks and then use increasingly sophisticated tactics, the researchers said.

But most cyberdefense programmes try to disrupt intruders before anyone can monitor the intruders’ techniques. DEEP-Dig will give researchers a window into hackers’ methods as they enter a decoy site stocked with disinformation.

The decoy site looks legitimate to intruders and attackers will feel they’re successful, said study researcher Latifur Khan. As hackers’ tactics change, DEEP-Dig could help cybersecurity defence systems keep up with their new tricks.

Hackers
Instead of blocking hackers, the researchers have created a new cybersecurity defence approach, which involves setting traps for hackers. Pixabay

According to the researchers, while DEEP-Dig aims to outsmart hackers, it might be possible that hackers could have the last laugh if they realise they have entered a decoy site and try to deceive the programme.

“So far, we’ve found this doesn’t work. When an attacker tries to play along, the defence system just learns how hackers try to hide their tracks, it’s an all-win situation — for us, that is,” Hamlen said.

ALSO READ: Lenovo Retains its Dominance Over Tablet Market in India With 37% Market Share

The study was presented at the annual Computer Security Applications Conference in December in Puerto Rico. (IANS)